Ireland In September: Weather, Things to See and Travel Tips

September starts the Fall season and it’s considered temperate weather. That means Ireland in September is one of the best months to visit the country. The weather is not that cold and there will be less crowd which is ideal. So, if you don’t know where to start yet, this Ireland travel guide for September should be able to help you.

ireland in september

What is the weather like in Ireland in September?

Temperature in Ireland in September

The climate of Ireland is influenced mainly by the Atlantic Ocean. As a result, Ireland doesn’t experience the same extreme temperatures that other countries have from the same latitudes.

Ireland in September will have an average of 9°C(48°F) to 13°C (55°F) temperature. It normally falls toward the end of the month as winter approaches.

Rain in Ireland in September

The average precipitation in September is between 10 to 20 days with 2.3 to 4.9 inches of rain. It depends on the region. So make sure to always prepare for rain just in case.

Wind in Ireland in September

The calmest day of the year, wind wise, has a wind blowing at about 5.7 miles an hour, but in September the wind averages between 12.1 to 13.4 miles an hour.

Sun in Ireland in September

Sunrise starts at around 6:30 AM and it gets later towards the end of the month at about an hour later. As winter approaches, the days get shorter as well.

What should I pack for Ireland in September?

September is the beginning of the Fall season in Ireland and layering is yet again another trick you can master. In general, September is still a pleasant-month in Ireland with a mixture of sunshine and rain shower but it’s not that warm neither.

Hoodie – You can also wear a hoodie on top of your innerwear. Hooded jackets can also shield you from light showers. Amazon is selling this pullover hoodie. Check it out here.

Jeans – Pack lots (or enough pair) of jeans most especially if you are easily cold and since there will be chances of rain, you definitely don’t want to repeat wet jeans, right?

Wool blazer – If you don’t want to be too casual, you can opt for a wool blazer like this one. You can go for a slim-fit type or the oversized type. What’s good about it is that you can easily layer it on top of your blouse or shirt while keeping a smart-casual look.

Boots – In case of heavy or constant rainfall, pack sturdy boots to keep you comfortable walking around. This signature Timberland boot is a perfect addition to your Fall packing list.

Fleece sweater – When the temperature begins to drop again, a fleece sweater should always be in your list. Its material will keep you warm– sometimes enough to be worn alone or you can wear it underneath your preferred outerwear.

Umbrella – Don’t forget to include an umbrella in your packing list to shield you from the rain. This compact travel umbrella from Amazon is a good option as it will easily fit in your luggage or in your everyday bag.

 

Where you should stay in Ireland in September

Although there are a lot of accommodations in Ireland that will fit any traveler’s budget, nothing beats the experience of staying in castle hotels in Ireland. So here are some of the affordable castle hotels that you can stay at in Ireland for the month of September. 

Cabra Castle Hotel still has the 18th-century castle vibes but with the modern touch from its amenities. A 4-star castle hotel in Cavan situated in a quiet neighborhood in Kingscourt, Cabra Castle Hotel is a mix and match of royalty and modern luxury. Rates start at $162. To book, click here.

A Gothic castle dated from 1209, Kinnitty Castle Hotel is located at the foot of Slieve Bloom Mountains. If you want the unique experience that comes with this castle, better check it out before it’s too late. Also, the rates start at only $110 a night. To book, click here.

Things to do in Ireland in September?

Although it’s colder and the days are shorter, there are still many things to do in Ireland in September. Some attractions might close earlier though so always make sure to check the opening hours and plan accordingly.

1. Go back in time with Brú na Bóinne ( Boyne Valley Tombs)

bru na boinne

Brú na Bóinne or Palace of the Boyne is valley tombs located near River Boyne, 8 km west of Drogheda. It contains one of the most important prehistoric landscapes in the world dating back from the Neolithic period.

Brú na Bóinne is famous for its Megalithic passage tombs called Knowth, Newgrange, and Dowth.

Archaeologists classified Newgrange, Knowth, and Dowth as passage tombs, however, these tombs are now recognized to be much more than passage tombs.  Ancient Temple is a more fitting classification, which is a place of astrological, spiritual, religious, and ceremonial importance.

If you are in the area, this is one of the best places to visit in Drogheda Ireland.

Opening Hours

February – April: Daily 09.30 – 17.30

May: Daily 09.00 – 18.30

June – Mid September: Daily 09.00 – 19.00

Mid – End September: Daily 09.00 – 18.30

October: Daily 09.30 – 17.30

November – January: Daily 09.00 – 17.00

Admission Fee

For the Exhibition and Newgrange and Knowth:

Adult: €13.00

Sen/Group: €10.00

Child/Student: €8.00

Family: €30.00

Contact Information

Location: Brú na Bóinne Visitor Centre, Donore, Meath

Email: brunaboinne@opw.ie

Phone: +353 41 9880300

Check out this deal for Newgrange, Monasterboice, and Hill of Tara: Full-Day Tour

2. Be amazed at The Cliffs of Moher

cliffs of moher

The Cliffs of Moher are sea cliffs located in County Clare, Ireland. It is one of Ireland’s most spectacular sights and one of the most visited attractions in Ireland with 1.5 million visitors annually.

Standing 702ft above the ground at their highest point and 8km long, the Cliffs boast one of the most amazing views in Ireland. On a good day, you can see the Aran Islands in Galway Bay.

Opening Hours

8 am to 7 pm although, during winter, the cliffs are closed by 5 pm.

Admission Fee

Adults €6

Students €4

Senior Citizens €4

Children under 16

Free Group rates available on request

Contact Information

Location: Lislorkan North, Liscannor, Co. Clare, Ireland

Phone: bookings@cliffsofmoher.ie

Email: +353 65 708 6145

3. Admire the castle of Kylemore

kylemore abbey castle

Kylemore Castle was built by Mitchell Henry, a wealthy doctor from England, as a gift to his wife Margaret in 1871. It was sold to the Duke and Duchess of Manchester in 1903 and was then purchased by the Irish Benedictine nuns in 1920.

Kylemore Abbey, a Benedictine monastery was then founded in 1920 on the grounds of Kylemore Castle, in Connemara. Since the 1970s, the estate has been opened to the public.

Nestled at the base of Druchruach Mountain and along the shore of Lough Pollacappul in Connemara, the Abbey is one of the most iconic attractions in Galway, Ireland. It is also one of the most beautiful castles in Ireland.

And no visit to Ireland is complete without spending a half-day to the castle ground.

Opening Hours

9:30 am to 4:30 pm. Last admission is at 4 pm.

Admission Fee

€13 for adult, €9 for a student, €10 for senior, and €26.00 for a family of 4.

Contact Information

Location:  Kylemore Abbey, Pollacappul, Connemara, Co. Galway, Ireland

Email: bookings@kylemoreabbey.com

4. Explore the island where two Star Wars were shot

Skellig Michael things to do in ireland

Skellig Michael is a twin-pinnacled rugged cliff that lies 12 km off the coast of Portmagee in South West Kerry. Rising majestically from the sea, Skellig Michael towers 714ft. (218 meters) above sea level.

On the summit of this awe-inspiring rock, you will find a remarkably well preserved 6th-century monastic settlement. This is one of the best things to see in Ireland and a visit to this major tourist attraction may well be the highlight of your holiday.

5. Visit Killarney – the start of Ring of Kerry

Ring of Kerry

Killarney is a lakeshore town in the County of Kerry about 4 hours away by bus from Dublin. It is a popular tourist destination in Ireland as it is one of the scenic stops in Ring of Kerry along with the towns of Kenmare and Dingle.

Famous for its national park, beautiful lakes, imposing castles, wildlife, and gorgeous landscapes, this town is named as one of the top 10 global tourist destinations in the world.

6. Rock of Cashel

Rock of Cashel

The Rock of Cashel, also known as Cashel of the Kings and St. Patrick’s Rock, is a historic site located at Cashel in County Tipperary. It is one of the most spectacular attractions in Ireland and also one of the most visited castles in Ireland.

This iconic landmark was the seat of the High Kings of Munster and was built between the 12th to the 13th century.

Opening Hours

9 am to 4:30 pm during winter and 9 am to 7 pm during the summer.

Admission Fee

Adult : €8.00, Group / Senior : €6.00, Child / Student : €4.00, Family : €20.00

Contact Information

Location: Rock of Cashel, Moor, Cashel, Co. Tipperary, Ireland

Phone: 062 61437

Email: rockofcashel@opw.ie

7. Explore Belfast

Queen's University, Belfast

Belfast is the largest city in Northern Ireland and along its size comes with a rich historical and political background. It is also best known for a lot of things like the Titanic and CS Lewis.

All these events gave birth to a lot of Belfast tourist attractions that first-time or frequent visitors will surely don’t want to miss. Today, there are a lot of museums and landmarks that you would want to include in your Instagram feed if you’re paying a visit.

8. Take a day trip to Aran Islands

Aran Islands

Aran Islands are a group of three rocky islands located in Galway Bay. The islands include Inishmore (Inis Mór – the largest island), Inishmaan (Inis Meáin – the second largest), and Inisheer (Inis Oírr – the smallest).

On the islands, you can explore ancient stone forts and churches, awesome cliffs, and flora and fauna. The islands are considered the soul of Gaelic culture and it’s considered one of the top island destinations by National Geographic.

9. Visit the Glasnevin Cemetery

Glasnevin Cemetery

A visit to the Glasnevin Cemetery in September will surely not disappoint if you want to learn more facts circulating Dublin. Feel free to walk around this cemetery, chit chat with their experienced set of tour guides, touch the grave of Daniel O’Connell, and dig deep into Dublin’s history. It is also one of the best outside museums in Dublin. 

Opening Times

Monday – Friday: 10:00am – 5:00pm | Saturday, Sunday and Bank Holiday Monday: 10:00am – 6:00pm

Admission Fee

Adult: €6.00, Child: €4.00

Contact Information

Address: Glasnevin Cemetery Finglas Road Glasnevin Dublin 11

Email: info@glasnevintrust.ie

Phone: + 353 01 882 6550

10. Explore the charming town of Kinsale

kinsale ireland

Kinsale is a town in County Cork, Ireland. Originally a medieval fishing port, historic Kinsale is one of the most picturesque and historic towns on the south-west coast of Ireland.

Kinsale has a beautiful set of long waterfront, yacht-filled harbor, narrow winding streets, and brightly painted galleries, shops, and houses. It is also a leading Irish tourist attraction and the southerly starting point of the Wild Atlantic Way trail.

11. Take a scenic road trip in Dingle

THINGS TO DO IN DINGLE IRELAND

The 46-km Slea Head Drive from Dingle in Ireland is one of the best and most spectacular driving routes in Ireland. It’s part of the Wild Atlantic Way route which is considered one of the most scenic road trip routes in the world.

The route consists of breathtaking views of the coastline, offshore islands, and cliff-top roads. It is one of the most popular activities in Dingle. It is also one of the best day trips from Cork City.

12. Learn trans-Atlantic travel history in Cobh

cobh ireland

Cobh was developed as a Victorian spa retreat in the mid-19th century and became Ireland’s most important port for trans-Atlantic travel.

If you would like to create some memories that will last a lifetime, take the plunge and visit Cobh. It is a captivating town that will hold you in its spell long after you’ve left.

Tours you should do in Ireland in September

 

Practical Tips for Ireland in September

1. As it can be windy, make sure to be careful when visiting the cliffs and the islands. The cliffs can be dangerous during the windy season so always walk with caution around the area especially if there’s no barrier on the edge.

Also, always verify first from the ferry companies before booking any of your tours or trips.

2. Always bring a raincoat or umbrella with you. Ireland’s weather in September can be fickle and always expect the worst especially when it comes to rain.

3. It starts to get colder during the evening so layer up to make sure you are well protected when it gets cold. You can also check out this packing list guide we have for Ireland.

4. Check out this list for more travel tips for Ireland for first-time visitors. 


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Ireland In November: Weather, Things to See and Travel Tips

Ireland in November can be as fun as the summer season. As long as you know where to go, what to pack, and what to do, your dream vacation in Ireland during the fall season can be amazing as any season.

So should you travel to Ireland in November? I’d say yes. The weather is not that cold and there will be less crowd which is ideal. So, if you don’t know where to start yet, this Ireland travel guide for November should be able to help you.

What is the weather in Ireland in November?

Ireland in november

The temperature in Ireland in November

The climate of Ireland is influenced mainly by the Atlantic Ocean. As a result, Ireland doesn’t experience the same extreme temperatures that other countries have from the same latitudes.

Ireland in November will have an average of 9.5°C(49°F) to 12°C (54°F) temperature. It normally falls toward the end of the month as winter approaches.

Rain in Ireland in November

The average precipitation in November is between 16 to 23 days with 2.4 to 6.7 inches of rain. It depends on the region. So make sure to always prepare for rain just in case. December and January are the wettest months as the winter slowly sets in the country.

Wind in Ireland in November

The calmest day of the year, wind wise, has a wind blowing at about 5.7 miles an hour, but in November the wind averages between 8 to 15 miles an hour. This doesn’t mean it’s windy every day. Some days could be incredibly calm, while on other days it could feel like you’re about to get swept off your feet completely!

Sun in Ireland in November

Days are shorter for Ireland in November. Sunrise will start at around 7:20 AM and set at around 5 PM. It gets shorter towards the end of the month so plan your activities accordingly.

What should you pack for Ireland in November?

what to wear in ireland in november

The temperature will continue to drop from the middle of the fall season until the end as it transitions to winter. During these times, you can expect more rainfall starting mid-October and a much cooler Ireland air. Be sure to consider these items if you’re not sure what to pack for Ireland in November.

 

Wool skirt – a wool skirt is great for those who don’t want to ditch those chic clothing pieces. You can also wear leggings underneath it. Check out this classic A-line wool skirt in Amazon.

Leggings – fleece-lined leggings will also save you from the dropping temperature. When buying one, be sure to choose a high-quality and opaque fabric like this listing in Amazon.

Fleece inner wear-  this will serve as your base clothing for layering. If you don’t have a fleece innerwear, a hoodie will do the trick.

Winter coat – Do not forget your winter coat in your “winter” packing list. This thick puffer coat in Amazon is a great addition to your list.

Jeans – Pack lots (or enough pair) of jeans most especially if you are easily cold and since there will be chances of rain, you definitely don’t want to repeat wet jeans, right?

Boots – In case of heavy or constant rainfall, pack sturdy boots to keep you comfortable walking around. This signature Timberland boot is a perfect addition to your Fall packing list.

Umbrella – Stay protected from the rain by bringing an umbrella with you.

Hoodie – You can also wear a hoodie on top of your innerwear. Hooded jackets can also shield you from light showers. Amazon is selling this pullover hoodie. Check it out here.

Chapstick – Also one of the most essential items for winter. The cold temperature will eventually make your lips crack so to prepare for this unpleasant feeling, pack with you a piece of chapstick.

Flannel – A flannel like this will work wonders if you want extra warmth. You can use it to layer underneath your coat and voila!

You can also check our packing guide for Ireland in all seasons here

Where you should stay in Ireland in November

Ashford Castle - Castle Hotels in Ireland
Ashford Castle Hotel

Although there are a lot of accommodations in Ireland that will fit any traveler’s budget, nothing beats the experience of staying in castle hotels in Ireland. So here are some of the affordable castle hotels that you can stay in Ireland for the month of November. 

Cabra Castle Hotel still has the 18th-century castle vibes but with the modern touch from its amenities. A 4-star castle hotel in Cavan situated in a quiet neighborhood in Kingscourt, Cabra Castle Hotel is a mix and match of royalty and modern luxury. Rates start at $162. To book, click here.

A Gothic castle dated from 1209, Kinnitty Castle Hotel is located at the foot of Slieve Bloom Mountains. If you want the unique experience that comes with this castle, better check it out before it’s too late. Also, the rates start at only $110 a night. To book, click here.

What is there to do in Ireland in November?

Although it’s colder and the days are shorter, there are still many things to do in Ireland in November. Some attractions might close earlier though so always make sure to check the opening hours and plan accordingly.

1. Go back in time with Brú na Bóinne ( Boyne Valley Tombs)

Knowth Brú na Bóinne

Brú na Bóinne or Palace of the Boyne is valley tombs located near River Boyne, 8 km west of Drogheda. It contains one of the most important prehistoric landscapes in the world dating back from the Neolithic period. Brú na Bóinne is famous for its Megalithic passage tombs called Knowth, Newgrange, and Dowth.

Archaeologists classified Newgrange, Knowth, and Dowth as passage tombs, however, these tombs are now recognized to be much more than passage tombs.  Ancient Temple is a more fitting classification, which is a place of astrological, spiritual, religious, and ceremonial importance.

If you are in the area, this is one of the best places to visit in Drogheda, Ireland.

Opening Hours

February – April: Daily 09.30 – 17.30

May: Daily 09.00 – 18.30

JuneMid September: Daily 09.00 – 19.00

Mid – End September: Daily 09.00 – 18.30

October: Daily 09.30 – 17.30

November – January: Daily 09.00 – 17.00

Admission Fee

For the Exhibition and Newgrange and Knowth:

Adult: €13.00

Sen/Group: €10.00

Child/Student: €8.00

Family: €30.00

Contact Information

Location: Brú na Bóinne Visitor Centre, Donore, Meath

Email: brunaboinne@opw.ie

Phone: +353 41 9880300

For more information about Brú na Bóinne, click here.

Check out this deal for Newgrange, Monasterboice, and Hill of Tara: Full-Day Tour

2. Be amazed at the Cliffs of Moher

cliffs of moher tour and tips

The Cliffs of Moher are sea cliffs located in County Clare, Ireland. It is one of Ireland’s most spectacular sights and one of the most visited attractions in Ireland with 1.5 million visitors annually.

Standing 702ft above the ground at their highest point and 8km long, the Cliffs boast one of the most amazing views in Ireland. On a good day, you can see the Aran Islands in Galway Bay.

Opening Hours

8 am to 7 pm although, during winter, the cliffs are closed by 5 pm.

Admission Fee

Adults €6

Students €4

Senior Citizens €4

Children under 16

Free Group rates available on request

Contact Information

Location: Lislorkan North, Liscannor, Co. Clare, Ireland

Phone: bookings@cliffsofmoher.ie

Email: +353 65 708 6145

3. Admire the castle of Kylemore

kylemore abbey castleKylemore Castle was built by Mitchell Henry, a wealthy doctor from England, as a gift to his wife Margaret in 1871. It was sold to the Duke and Duchess of Manchester in 1903 and was then purchased by the Irish Benedictine nuns in 1920.

Kylemore Abbey, a Benedictine monastery was then founded in 1920 on the grounds of Kylemore Castle, in Connemara. Since the 1970s, the estate has been opened to the public.

Nestled at the base of Druchruach Mountain and along the shore of Lough Pollacappul in Connemara, the Abbey is one of the most iconic attractions in Galway, Ireland.

It is also one of the most beautiful castles in Ireland. And no visit to Ireland is complete without spending a half-day to the castle ground.

Check out this Kylemore Abbey Tour article for more information.

Opening Hours

9:30 am to 4:30 pm. The last admission is at 4 pm.

Admission Fee

€13 for adult, €9 for a student, €10 for senior, and €26.00 for a family of 4.

Contact Information

Location:  Kylemore Abbey, Pollacappul, Connemara, Co. Galway, Ireland

Email: bookings@kylemoreabbey.com

4. Take a glimpse of the past in Trinity College

trinity college dublin

If you enjoy walking down memory lane, give it a shot at Trinity College where you can find a collection of Ireland’s treasured past in its Long Room Library. This 200-foot-long room holds 200,000 books as old as you can possibly imagine.

The most popular treasure in this library is the Book of Kells which has a great role in the Irish identity. Trinity College is also one of the best free things to do in Dublin, Ireland.

5. Visit the Glasnevin Cemetery

A visit to the Glasnevin Cemetery in November will surely not disappoint if you want to learn more facts circulating Dublin.

Feel free to walk around this cemetery, chit chat with their experienced set of tour guides, touch the grave of Daniel O’Connell, and dig deep into Dublin’s history.

It is also one of the best outside museums in Dublin. 

Opening Times

Monday – Friday: 10:00am – 5:00pm | Saturday, Sunday and Bank Holiday Monday: 10:00am – 6:00pm

Admission Fee

Adult: €6.00, Child: €4.00

Contact Information

Address: Glasnevin Cemetery Finglas Road Glasnevin Dublin 11

Email: info@glasnevintrust.ie

Phone: + 353 01 882 6550

6. Find the perfect pint at Guinness

Guinness Irish drink

If you have an eye for the perfect pint, the Guinness Storehouse is an experience of a lifetime. This seven-story building stands proudly as the home of the most famous beer in the whole world.

Today, tourists can now learn its history and enjoy one of the best Irish drinks. Every floor holds exciting surprises for everyone.

Guinness Storehouse is also the most visited attraction in Ireland.

7. Explore Glenveagh National Park

Glenveagh National Park

Glenveagh National Park is one of Donegal’s treasures and Ireland’s second-largest national park. The park is located 15 kilometers west of Letterkenny. It unfolds across 16,500 hectares of heathland, forest, and bare mountain slopes around the amazing Lough Veagh.

It is known for Glenveagh Castle and Glenveagh valley – one of the most beautiful landscapes in Ireland and the national park is one of the ideal places to do some hiking in Ireland in November.

Opening Times

The visitor center is open from 9 am to 5 pm. The park is open from dawn till dusk. The castle tour is from 9 am to 5 pm but limited during the off-peak and winter season. To verify the schedule, click here

Admission Fee

Admission fee is free for the park. But individual attraction such as the castle has an entrance fee.

For the castle tour admission fees: Adult Castle Ticket €7.00 | Concession Castle Ticket €5.00 | Family Castle Ticket €15.00

Contact Information

Email: glenveaghbookings@ahg.gov.ie

Phone: +353 76 1002537

8. Explore the charming town of Kinsale

kinsale ireland

Kinsale is a town in County Cork, Ireland. Originally a medieval fishing port, historic Kinsale is one of the most picturesque and historic towns on the south-west coast of Ireland.

Kinsale has a beautiful set of long waterfront, yacht-filled harbor, narrow winding streets, and brightly painted galleries, shops, and houses.

It is also a leading Irish tourist attraction and the southerly starting point of the Wild Atlantic Way trail.

9. Take a scenic road trip in Dingle

The 46-km Slea Head Drive from Dingle in Ireland is one of the best and most spectacular driving routes in Ireland. It’s part of the Wild Atlantic Way route which is considered one of the most scenic road trip routes in the world.

The route consists of breathtaking views of the coastline, offshore islands, and cliff-top roads and it’s best to access through driving on your own.

It is one of the most popular activities in Dingle and also one of the best day trips from Cork City.

10. Visit Galway City

spanish arch galway

Galway City and nothing else comes to mind if we speak about Ireland’s top destination for arts, music, and urban culture.

This city on the west coast of Ireland never fails to exceed expectations- from its medieval walls down to the breathtaking view of the River Corrib.

So whether you’re coming over for a quick visit or longer, there’s just so much to enjoy in this harbor city.

11. Explore Limerick City and its Georgian houses

limerick city

Known for its medieval and charming old town, Limerick is one of the major cities in Ireland. It is famous for its Georgian houses and compact town with King John’s Castle as the most recognizable site.

The city also boasts amazing museums, gorgeous architecture, and several attractions. So if you are visiting Ireland in November, this city is a must.

Practical Tips for Ireland in November

1. As it can be windy, make sure to be careful when visiting the cliffs and the islands. The cliffs can be dangerous during the windy season so always walk with caution around the area especially if there’s no barrier on the edge.

Also, always verify first from the ferry companies before booking any of your tours or trips.

2. Always bring a raincoat with you. Ireland’s weather in November can be a pickle and always expect the worst especially when it comes to rain.

3. Always double-check the opening hours of the tourist attractions as they normally close earlier from November to February.

4. Because November is in the middle of the summer and winter season, make sure to prepare for colder weather. Especially at night which can be very cold and freezing.

5. Check out this list for more travel tips for Ireland for first-time visitors. 


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12 Best Things To Do In County Louth, Ireland

A visit to the beautiful County Louth in Ireland will surely be one filled with instant history lessons and quirky urban legends. With myths and tales attached to most of its attractions, you’re bound to experience not just the sights but its rich history as well. Here’s a list to guide you with the best things to do in Louth, Ireland to ensure that you’ll make the most of your stay.

12 Best Things To Do In County Louth, Ireland

1. Smarmore Castle, County Louth

Smarmore Castle Louth Ireland

Smarmore Castle is one of the smallest castles in Ireland and is one of those Irish castles where a family actually lived for a long time, like centuries.

This castle dates back to the 14th century and was the residence of the Taafe family from 1330 until the 1980s. It is certainly one of Louth’s attractions and is situated between Collon and Ardee.

Decades ago, it was sold for half a million Euros and all its contents were auctioned off.  The castle was then converted into a hotel, and at present, houses a center for the treatment of alcoholism and addiction. The castle isn’t open to the public but you can explore the grounds and marvel at the grand structure from a distance.

Contact Information

Address: Smarmore near Ardee County Louth Ireland A92 YY22

Phone: +353 41 986 5080

Email: info@smarmorecastle.ie 

2. County Museum Dundalk

The award-winning museum County Museum Dundalk houses permanent exhibitions, temporary displays, and hosts music recitals and film screenings.

Situated in the town of Dundalk, County Louth, it is set inside a beautifully restored late 18th-century warehouse.

The museum was funded by Dundalk Town Council, started in 1994, and celebrates County Louth’s rich, social, industrial, and cultural history from the Stone Age up to the present day, in its exhibition galleries.

It also has a 72-seater theatre where visitors can watch a short film introducing the attractions of County Louth or see concerts and recitals.

Opening Hours

Tuesday to Saturday – 10.00am – 5.00pm
Sundays and Monday – Closed
Bank Holidays – Closed

Admission Fee

Adults – €2
Children – €1
Family – €5
Groups of 10+ – 20% Discount
School Groups – 50c per Child

Contact Information

Address: 8 Jocelyn St, Townparks, Dundalk, Co. Louth, A91 EFY9, Ireland

Phone: 042 9392999

Email: info@dundalkmuseum.ie

3. Knockabbey Castle, County Louth

Formerly called Thomastown Castle, Knockabbe is located in County Louth and was built around 1399. It has gone through many improvements since it was built, and each of the families who lived there left their mark.

Knockabbey Castle has some of the finest historical water gardens in the country, which dates back to the 11th century.

Thriving in the gardens are a wide variety of trees and even tulips, and an afternoon or even a full day of strolling around Knockabbey makes for one of the more unique things to do in Louth.

The 30 acres of lush greens, which include meadows, herbaceous border, formal Victorian gardens with restored glasshouse, and parkland also introduces you to Irish gardening history.

Contact Information

Address: Philipstown, Co. Louth, Ireland

Phone:+353 1 6778816

Email:info@knockabbeycastle.com

4. St Peter’s Church, County Louth

St Peter's Church Drogheda

Located in the center of Drogheda, this gothic church houses the shrine of Saint Oliver Plunkett, and his preserved head even forms the centerpiece of the shrine. With an older church built in its place, parts of that structure were incorporated into the present building.

The interiors of St. Peter’s include fine sculptures, a spectacular high altar made from marble, and stained glass windows.

Opening Hours

Saturday Vigil 6:15 pm
Sunday 8:00 am, 11:00am, 12:15pm
Weekdays 10:30 am & 8: 30 am

Contact Information

Address: St Peter’s Parish, Drogheda Co.Louth

Phone: 353 41 983 8537

Email:parishoffice@saintpetersdrogheda.ie

5. Beaulieu House and Gardens

Beaulieu House and Gardens Louth

One of the earliest unfortified houses in Ireland, the historic Beaulieu House and Gardens has been home to two families, the Plunketts and the Tichbournes, for over 800 years and is one of the prettiest places to visit in Louth.

Located near Drogheda, County Louth, and situated on the banks of the Boyne, it was built between 1600 and 1666.

Beaulieu House has impressive interior design, a grand staircase, a high eaved roof, a dormered attic, and red brick window dressings, reflecting a variety of design influences.

The house hasn’t been altered much since it was built and the last improvements made on the Interior décor, paintings, wood carvings, and grand staircase were done back in 1723.

Beaulieu has four acres of gardens surrounding the estate and like the house, hasn’t been changed much.

Opening Hours

By Appointment only.

Contact Information

Address: Beaulieu House and Garden Drogheda, Co. Louth, A92 PD3R Ireland

Phone: 353 (0) 41 983 8557

Email: cara@beaulieuhouse.ie

6. Old Mellifont Abbey

Old Mellifont Abbey Louth

Ireland’s first Cistercian monastery is the Mellifont Abbey, founded in 1142.

It is located just 10 minutes from Drogheda, and among its most-visited parts are the monks’ chapter house and an octagonal 12th-century lavabo, which was used by the monks when washing their hands.

The Abbey’s visitor center houses an exhibition on the work of masons in the Middle Ages, with fine examples of their craft on display, as well as remnants of the abbey’s gate and its church.

This place is only accessed through a stone stairway, while the Visitor Centre is accessible for guests with disabilities.

Opening Hours

30th May – 4th September: Daily 10.00 – 18.00
Last admission 45 minutes before closing.
Average Length of Visit: 1 hour

Admission Fee

Adult: €5.00
Group/Senior: €4.00
Child/Student: €3.00
Family: €13.00

Contact Information

Address: 2 Dominick St, Mellifont, Drogheda, Co. Louth, A92 PR84, 

Phone: (041) 9826103

Email: info@mellifontabbey.ie 

7. Monasterboice, County Louth

Monasterboice Louth

Said to have been founded by a follower of St. Patrick, Monasterboice is one of Ireland’s monastic sites.

Located close to Drogheda,  the remarkable ruins include a cemetery, 2 churches, one of the tallest round towers, and two of the tallest high crosses in Ireland which are what attracts visitors to this site mostly. The round tower is about 30 meters high and was used as a watchtower and refuge for monks.

Like most towers, it is not open to the public but it is quite picturesque and along with the rest of Monasterboice, is one of the best things to see in Louth.

8. Clochafarmore Standing Stone

Clochafarmore Standing Stone Louth

An impressive monument that stands at over 3 meters high and 1.3 meters wide; and like most standing stones believed to mark locations where great events took place, Clochafarmore is associated with the greatest hero of Irish folklore – Cúchulainn.

Located in Knockbridge County Louth, the name Clochafarmore comes from the Irish Cloch a Fhir Mhóir which means ‘Stone of the Big Man’.

The field where it is located is locally called ‘The Field of Slaughter’. A rather weird etymology and even stranger nickname for its location, but a visit here make for one of the best things to do in Louth, especially if you’re into walking and Irish folktales.

To get here, you’ll climb a low stile, cross a single-strand electric cattle fence and walk for 200 meters across a grazing field.

9. The Kildemock Jumping Church

The Kildemock Jumping Church

The Kildemock Jumping Church dates back to the 14th century and part of its west gable now stands inside the wall of the original foundation.

Situated just 4km south of Ardee in Millockstown, County Louth, this religious ruin is not without a quirky legend attached to it.

It got its strange name from an old tale that says that the west gable of the building jumped two feet inside the wall of the original foundation to exclude an excommunicated church member who had been buried in the church.

The structure does look like it is trying today something so if only to marvel at this spectacle, make this a part of your Louth itinerary.

10. Proleek Dolmen, County Louth

Proleek Portal Tomb

An interesting structure that comes with several quirky myths and tales, the grand Proleek Portal Tomb is situated in the parklands of Ballymascanlon Hotel. It is called a portal tomb because legends say that the two large stones, that sit in the upright position, serve as a portal or a way into the funeral chamber.

If only for these strange myths, the Proleek is definitely worth visiting. There’s another tale that says that if a stone stays on top of the dolmen if you throw it up there – you will be married in a year.

So whether you’re looking to get married or simply want to hear more about what folks have to say about Proleek a trip here is surely a treat when you’re in Louth.

Opening Hours

24 Hours

Contact Information

Address: Proleek, Dundalk, Co. Louth, Ireland

Phone:+353 42 9352111

Email:info@dundalktouristoffice.ie

11. Stephenstown Pond Nature Park & The Dairy Maid Coffee Shop

tephenstown Pond Louth

An ideal venue for picnics, Stephenstown Pond Nature Park and the Dairy Maid Coffee Shop is an 8km lakeside green space.

A day at the Stephenstown is one of the best things to do in Louth on weekends, as it offers fun and relaxation all in one place. You can stroll along the lakeshore or simply hang out nearby on your picnic mat.

You can also feed the ducks and swans, as you enjoy the peaceful scenery.

You can enjoy some delicious homemade goodies at The Dairy Maid Coffee Shop, which is housed at the 19th century Burns Cottage previously owned by the sister of Irish poet Robert Burns.

Opening Hours

Nature Park
May – September: 08.30 am – 20.30
October – April: 09.00 – 17.00

Coffee Shop
May- September : 09.30am – 17.00pm
October-April 09.30am –  17.00pm

Contact Information

Address: Stephenstown Pond Project, Knockbridge, Dundalk, Co. Louth, 

Phone: +353 42 937 9019

12. Carlingford Lough

Carlingford Lough

A lough, or lake with a rich history, its name Carlingford was given due to a Viking activity and the settlement on the southern shore. The lake first appeared after the ice age, and Carlingford has been a witness to so many activities all throughout its history.

At present, the town where it is located and also its namesake remains as one of Ireland’s well-kept medieval villages. With its protective walls, narrow streets, Friary, and urban Tower structures, a stroll along Carlington is like stepping into an old era, making it one of the more interesting points of interest in Louth.

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10 Top Things To Do In Drogheda, Ireland

Drogheda is one of the oldest towns in Ireland. It is known for its tourism and as a center of medical care. Drogheda lies between two counties, with the southern part of the town located in County Meath and the rest in County Louth. If you are planning a trip to this town, here are the top things to do in Drogheda, Ireland.

10 Things To Do In Drogheda, Ireland


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1. Go back in time with Brú na Bóinne ( Boyne Valley Tombs)

Brú na Bóinne ireland

Brú na Bóinne or Palace of the Boyne is valley tombs located near River Boyne, 8 km west of Drogheda. It contains one of the most important pre-historic landscapes in the world dating back from Neolithic period.

Brú na Bóinne is famous for its Megalithic passage tombs called Knowth, Newgrange, and Dowth.

Archaeologists classified Newgrange, Knowth, and Dowth as passage tombs, however, these tombs are now recognized to be much more than passage tombs. 

Ancient Temple is a more fitting classification, which is a place of astrological, spiritual, religious and ceremonial importance.

If you are in the area, this is one of the best places to visit in Drogheda Ireland.

Opening Hours

February – April: Daily 09.30 – 17.30

May: Daily 09.00 – 18.30

June – Mid September: Daily 09.00 – 19.00

Mid – End September: Daily 09.00 – 18.30

October: Daily 09.30 – 17.30

November – January: Daily 09.00 – 17.00

Admission Fee

For the Exhibition and Newgrange and Knowth:

Adult: €13.00

Sen/Group: €10.00

Child/Student: €8.00

Family: €30.00

Contact Information

Location: Brú na Bóinne Visitor Centre, Donore, Meath

Email: brunaboinne@opw.ie

Phone: +353 41 9880300

For more information about Brú na Bóinne, click here.

Check out this deal for Newgrange, Monasterboice, and Hill of Tara: Full-Day Tour

2. Have fun at Boyne Boats Adventure

 

 
 
 
 
 
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Want to listen about the battle of Westeros? I mean the battle of the Boyne! This popular activity in Drogheda features the currachs, a traditional Irish boat.

Visitors take a boat tour along the Boyne canal. And as you paddle along the Boyne navigation system, the guide tells the history that shaped Ireland and the popular story of the Battle of the Boyne.

It is entertaining with an audio-enhanced experience and the best part? Games of Thrones shot some scenes in the area where guides acted as bit players. Check out their stories about their GOT experience.

Opening Hours

Wednesday to Sunday from 11 am to 5 pm

Admission Fee

Adult (18+) €20 | Teenager (13-17) €15 |  Child (3-12) €10 | Family of 4 (2 Adults & 2 Chilren) €50

Contact Information

Location: Oldbridge, Meath, Ireland

Email: info@boyneboats.ie

Phone: +353 86 361 6420

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3. Learn history at the Battle of the Boyne Visitor Centre

Battle of the Boyne Visitor Centre Meath

Battle of the Boyne Visitor Centre is located in the 18th century Oldbridge House which is the exact location of the infamous battle between two kings; King James II and his son-in-law William III.

The battle had the largest soldiers deployed in the history of Irish battlefield. King James had over 25000 troops while William III had over 36000 soldiers.

The battle took place on July 1st, 1690 where William’s forces defeated King James’ army. The battle is one of the most symbolic battles in the history of British Isles.

Opening Hours

May – September Daily 9.00 – 17.00

October – April Daily 9.00 – 16.00

Admission Fee

 Adult €4 | Group/senior €3 | Child €2 | Family €10

Contact Information

Location: Oldbridge, Meath, Ireland

Email: battleoftheboyne@opw.ie

Phone: +353 41 9809950

4. Check out Magdalene Tower, Drogheda

Magdalene Tower Drogheda

Magdalene Tower is a landmark located at the highest point of the northern part of Drogheda, County Louth. All that now remains of the once important of Saint Mary Magdalene is freestanding single-bay three-stage bell tower.

Lucas de Netterville, then Archbishop of Armagh, founded the monastery in 1224.  It was here Ulster chiefs acknowledged their submission to Richard II, King of England in 1367.

Opening Hours

24 hours

Admission Fee

Free

Contact Information

Location: 9 Magdalene St, Upper Mell, Drogheda, Co. Louth, Ireland

5. Visit Slane Castle

Slane Castle

Slane Castle is located within the Boyne Valley near Navan and is set in the middle of a 1,500-acre estate. The castle was built in the 18th century and has been a family seat for the Conyngham family.

Today, the castle is a famous concert venue that held concerts for world music icons such as The Rolling Stones, U2, Madonna, Guns N’ Roses, Bob Dylan, Queens, Bruce Springsteen to name a few.

Although Slane castle is not part of Drogheda, it is closed enough for a quick trip.

It’s only around 15 minutes’ drive away from Drogheda and it’s one of the best day trips from Dublin and one of the best castles in Ireland.

Opening Hours

The guided tours to the castle are seasonal and only if there’s no event. To check for the latest tour schedule, click here.

Admission Fee

Adults: €12.00, Children: €7.20, Students, O.A.P.’s & Groups: €10.80, Children under 5 years are free

Contact Information

Location: Navan Road, Slane Meath

Email: jemma@slanecastle.ie

Phone: +353 41 9820643

Check out this Boyne Valley: Full-Day Celts and Castles Guided Tour for just €35

6. St Laurence’s Gate and the Drogheda Walls

St Laurence's Gate things to do in drogheda

St Laurence’s Gate is a fortified gateway built in 13th century as part of the walled fortifications in Drogheda.

The Anglo-Normans made the town as one of their primary strongholds by building walls around it that enclosed 113 acres area. Drogheda was one of the largest walled towns during that time.

Opening Hours

24 hours

Admission Fee

Free

Contact Information

Location: Laurence Street, Drogheda, Louth

Email: droghedatouristoffice@gmail.com

Phone:  +353 41 9872843

7. Explore the Beaulieu House and Gardens in Drogheda 

Beaulieu House and Gardens Drogheda

This unfortified mansion is a journey back through Ireland’s past. The house was built in the 1600s by de Verdun family. Noble families and statesmen lived in the mansion since then which whom was a big part of the Irish history.

Beaulieu House is surrounded by 4 acres of gardens and grassy terraces for plant lovers.

Opening Hours

June 1st -September 1st.

Monday-Friday, 11-5pm.

Weekend Opening in July and August, 1pm-5pm

To verify the opening hours, make sure to call in advance.

Contact Information

Location:  Cross, Beaulieu, Drogheda, Co. Louth, A92 PD3R, Ireland

Email: info@beaulieuhouse.ie

Phone: +353 41 9838557

8. Check out the Mellifont Abbey in Drogheda

Mellifont Abbey Meath

Mellifont Abbey is the first abbey built in Ireland on 1142 through the orders of Saint MalachyArchbishop of Armagh. It housed over a hundred monks and three hundred laymen. The ruins of the abbey are still standing 10 minutes away from the centre of Drogheda.

Opening Hours

31st May – 5th September: Daily 10 am – 6 pm

Admission Fee

Adult: €5.00

Group/Senior: €4.00

Child/Student: €3.00

Family: €13.00

Contact Information

Location: Tullyallen, Drogheda, Co. Louth

Email: mellifontabbey@opw.ie

Phone: +353 1 836 6111

9.Millmount Museum & Martello Tower

.Millmount Museum & Martello Tower Drogheda

The Martello Tower was built in the mound of Millmount in 1808 after Oliver Cromwell attached the town that killed over 2500 men on September 11th, 1649. The tower was created to avoid the same destiny and to prevent the invasion of the French people. Today the tower complex houses the Millmount Museum which houses a wide variety of artifacts of local and national importance.

Opening Hours

Monday – Saturday 10 am – 5:30 pm | Sunday and Bank Holiday 2 pm – 5 pm

Admission Fee

Museum-Adult €3.50 | Child €2.50 | Student €3 | Family €8 | Tower-Adult €3 | Child €2 | Student €2.50 | Family €6 | Tower and Museum-Adult €5.50 | Child €3 | Student €4 | Family €12

Contact Information

Location: Millmount, Drogheda, Louth

Email: info@droghedamuseum.ie

Phone: +353 41 9833097

10. Peruse arts in Highlanes Gallery

 

 
 
 
 
 
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Highlanes Gallery is a public art gallery and visual arts exhibition centre which opened in 2006. It showcases national and international temporary exhibitions and the Drogheda Municipal Art Collection which includes fascinating collections dating back from the 18th century.

Opening Hours

Monday to Saturday: 10:30am – 5:00pm

Admission Fee

Admission to the gallery is free but a donation is welcomed.

Contact Information

Location: 36 St Laurence St, Lagavooren, Drogheda, Co. Louth, A92 F7PH

Email: info@highlanes.ie 

Phone: +353 (0) 41 9803311

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10 top things to do in Drogheda, Ireland

Ireland In June: Weather, Things To See And Travel Tips

Ireland in June is a good idea. With less rain and wind, you will be rewarded with better weather but with less crowd than July or August which are both the summer peak months.

So if you are planning to visit Ireland in June, here’s our travel guide for enjoying Ireland in summer.

Is June a good time to go to Ireland?

June is one of the best months to travel to Ireland. Because it’s the start of the summer season, the weather is better and more attractions are open. June is also considered the driest month in the south of the country. So if you are looking to do more outdoorsy stuff, June is one of the best months to visit Ireland.

What is the weather in Ireland in June?

What is the average temperature in Ireland in June?

The climate of Ireland is influenced mainly by the Atlantic Ocean. As a result, Ireland doesn’t experience the same extreme temperatures that other countries have from the same latitudes.

As the summer begins, Ireland in June will have an average of 14°C(56°F) to 17°C (63°F) temperature.

Rain in Ireland in June

The average precipitation in June is 8-21 days with up to 70 mm of rain depending on the city. So make sure to always prepare for rain just in case.

Wind in Ireland in June

The average hourly wind speed in June remains constant all throughout the month with an average of from .02 miles per hour to 11 miles per hour.

Sun in Ireland in June

Days are longer for Ireland in June. Sunrise will start at around 5 AM and set at around 9:30 PM. It gets longer towards the end of the month so that means extra hours for activities and sightseeing.

What should you pack for Ireland in June?

June marks the beginning of the Summer season in Ireland. It is expected to be warmer than the previous months but rain and wind are expected to be around the corner too. Be sure to come prepared by having these items on your packing list.

Leggings – Finally, a month where you can wear a light piece of clothing. If you hate wearing jeans, a pair of leggings is a perfect addition to your list. Also, it won’t take too much space in your bag too! Be sure to consider these stretchy and opaque leggings on your next trip.

Pencil Mini-Skirt – A pencil mini-skirt can be a very versatile piece of clothing and it is perfect for Ireland summer. If a slight chill makes you uncomfortable, you can pair it up with leggings. Otherwise, feel free to flaunt those gorgeous legs. This Bohemian floral skirt is a cute OOTD statement for the ‘gram. If you’re more into a bolder look, check out this zip-up pencil skirt in Amazon.

Knee-length skirt – Here’s another option if you don’t want to wear leggings but also can’t stand the summer chill. A knee-length skirt like this one is a good find. You’ll be chic and fab once you pair it with a cute summer top.

Jeans – If you just want to be plain casual, a pair of jeans is your best friend. Be more trendy with a pair of denim ripped jeans like this one. For men, this pair of distressed jeans is a good find.

Plain shirt – One of the most basic items in your packing list is a plain shirt. The breathable fabric of a shirt makes it great for summer. Also, when it gets chilly, you can always grab a cardigan. This shirt from Amazon has a lot of color variety you can choose from.

Cardigan – Long or short, wearing a cardigan in summer makes you look fashionable yet comfortable.

Flats – You can wear cute flats in summer if you don’t want your feet to be too exposed.

 

Where you should stay in Ireland in June

Ashford Castle County Mayo

Although there are a lot of accommodations in Ireland that will fit any traveler’s budget, nothing beats the experience of staying in castle hotels in Ireland. So here are some of the affordable castle hotels that you can stay at in Ireland for the month of June. 

Cabra Castle Hotel still has the 18th-century castle vibes but with the modern touch from its amenities. A 4-star castle hotel in Cavan situated in a quiet neighborhood in Kingscourt, Cabra Castle Hotel is a mix and match of royalty and modern luxury. Rates start at $162. To book, click here.

A Gothic castle dated from 1209, Kinnitty Castle Hotel is located at the foot of Slieve Bloom Mountains. If you want the unique experience that comes with this castle, better check it out before it’s too late. Also, the rates start at only $110 a night. To book, click here.

What to do in Ireland in June?

Because of better weather and longer days, you will be able to do more stuff when you visit Ireland in June.

1. Be amazed at the Cliffs of Moher

cliffs of moher tour and tips

The Cliffs of Moher are sea cliffs located in County Clare, Ireland. It is one of Ireland’s most spectacular sights and one of the most visited attractions in Ireland with 1.5 million visitors annually.

Standing 702ft above the ground at their highest point and 8km long, the Cliffs boast one of the most amazing views in Ireland. On a good day, you can see the Aran Islands in Galway Bay.

Opening Hours

8 am to 7 pm although, during winter, the cliffs are closed by 5 pm.

Admission Fee

Adults €6

Students €4

Senior Citizens €4

Children under 16

Free Group rates available on request

Contact Information

Location: Lislorkan North, Liscannor, Co. Clare, Ireland

Phone: bookings@cliffsofmoher.ie

Email: +353 65 708 6145

2. Go back in time with Brú na Bóinne ( Boyne Valley Tombs)

Knowth Brú na Bóinne

Brú na Bóinne or Palace of the Boyne is valley tombs located near River Boyne, 8 km west of Drogheda. It contains one of the most important prehistoric landscapes in the world dating back from the Neolithic period. Brú na Bóinne is famous for its Megalithic passage tombs called Knowth, Newgrange, and Dowth.

Archaeologists classified Newgrange, Knowth, and Dowth as passage tombs, however, these tombs are now recognized to be much more than passage tombs.  Ancient Temple is a more fitting classification, which is a place of astrological, spiritual, religious, and ceremonial importance.

If you are in the area, this is one of the best places to visit in Drogheda, Ireland.

Opening Hours

February – April: Daily 09.30 – 17.30

May: Daily 09.00 – 18.30

June – Mid September: Daily 09.00 – 19.00

Mid – End September: Daily 09.00 – 18.30

October: Daily 09.30 – 17.30

NovemberJanuary: Daily 09.00 – 17.00

Admission Fee

For the Exhibition and Newgrange and Knowth:

Adult: €13.00
Sen/Group: €10.00
Child/Student: €8.00
Family: €30.00

Contact Information

Location: Brú na Bóinne Visitor Centre, Donore, Meath

Email: brunaboinne@opw.ie

Phone: +353 41 9880300

For more information about Brú na Bóinne, click here.

Check out this deal for Newgrange, Monasterboice, and Hill of Tara: Full-Day Tour

3. Surf at Lahinch

Lahinch Beach is a sandy, crescent-shaped Blue Flag beach in the town of Lahinch in County Clare. It is located in Liscannor Bay and faces the Atlantic Ocean which gives the beach its famous swells.

The beach is a popular kayaking, kite surfing, and surfing spot in the country. It is also near Cliffs of Moher and the Burren, making it an ideal side trip for those visiting these famous Irish attractions. It is also one of the most convenient day trips from Galway.

Contact Information

Address: Lahinch Beach, Lahinch, Clare, Republic of Ireland

Email: secretar@clarecoco.ie

4. Admire the castle of Kylemore

kylemore abbey castle

Kylemore Castle was built by Mitchell Henry, a wealthy doctor from England, as a gift to his wife Margaret in 1871. It was sold to the Duke and Duchess of Manchester in 1903 and was then purchased by the Irish Benedictine nuns in 1920.

Kylemore Abbey, a Benedictine monastery was then founded in 1920 on the grounds of Kylemore Castle, in Connemara. Since the 1970s, the estate has been opened to the public.

Nestled at the base of Druchruach Mountain and along the shore of Lough Pollacappul in Connemara, the Abbey is one of the most iconic attractions in Galway, Ireland. It is also one of the most beautiful castles in Ireland. And no visit to Ireland is complete without spending a half-day to the castle ground.

Opening Hours

9:30 am to 4:30 pm. The last admission is at 4 pm.

Admission Fee

€13 for adult, €9 for a student, €10 for senior, and €26.00 for a family of 4.

Contact Information

Location:  Kylemore Abbey, Pollacappul, Connemara, Co. Galway, Ireland

Email: bookings@kylemoreabbey.com

5. Visit Galway City

spanish arch galway

Galway City and nothing else comes to mind if we speak about Ireland’s top destination for arts, music, and urban culture. This city on the west coast of Ireland never fails to exceed expectations- from its medieval walls down to the breathtaking view of the River Corrib.

So whether you’re coming over for a quick visit or longer, there’s just so much to enjoy in this harbor city.

6. Take a road trip in Dingle

Dingle in Ireland is a small port town in Dingle Peninsula, about 4 hours away from Dublin. It is one of the scenic stops in Ring of Kerry along with Kenmare and Killarney.

Dingle is known for its rugged scenery, trails, and sandy beaches so it’s one of the best places to do a road trip in Ireland.

7. Explore King John’s Castle and Limerick City

king john's castle limerick

King John’s Castle is a 13th-century castle located on King’s Island in Limerick and next to the River Shannon. The castle overlooks the river and the panoramic view of Limerick City.

The stunning new exhibition brings to life over 800 years of King John’s Castle and Limerick City’s dramatic history all through Touch-screen technology which will connect visitors to tales of siege and warfare.

And if you are staying in neighboring cities, it is one of the best day trips that you can do from Dublin, Cork or Galway.

Opening Hours

09.30 am – 5 pm

Admission Fee

€10 for adult, €5 for children and €22 for family (2 adults + 2 children)

Contact Information

Address: Nicholas St, Limerick, Ireland

8. Hike at Benbulben

Benbulben

Benbulben is the Table Mountain of Ireland. This large rock formation was formed by moving glaciers during Ice Age.

The mountain is part of the Dartry Mountains in an area known as Yeats Country – a name after the famous writer and poet W.B. Yeats. The Benbulben offers the best view of Sligo town and it’s an easy trail to hike.

It is only 15-20 minutes away from the town center and although a popular attraction in Sligo town, it is not touristy. Along the trail are rolling hills and beautiful landscapes of forest, bogs, and plants.

9. Explore the charming town of Cobh

cobh ireland

Cobh was developed as a Victorian spa retreat in the mid-19th century and became Ireland’s most important port for trans-Atlantic travel.

If you would like to create some memories that will last a lifetime, take the plunge and visit Cobh. It is a captivating town that will hold you in its spell long after you’ve left.

10. Take a day trip to Aran Islands

Aran Islands

Aran Islands are a group of rocky islands located in Galway Bay. The islands include Inishmore (Inis Mór – the largest island), Inishmaan (Inis Meáin – the second largest), and Inisheer (Inis Oírr – the smallest).

On the islands, you can explore ancient stone forts and churches, awesome cliffs, and flora and fauna.

The islands are considered the soul of Gaelic culture and it’s considered one of the top island destinations by National Geographic.

Practical Tips for Ireland in June

1. As it can be windy, make sure to be careful when visiting the cliffs and the islands. The cliffs can be dangerous during the windy season so always walk with caution around the area especially if there’s no barrier on the edge.

2. Although June is the driest month in some areas in Ireland, make sure to prepare for rain as the weather in Ireland can be fickle. Here’s our complete guide for a packing list on Ireland for all season to help you plan your next trip to Ireland.

3. Always layer up. It might be warm one moment but it can get really cold especially at night.

4. Check out this list for more travel tips for Ireland for first-time visitors. 


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Brú na Bóinne: The Boyne Valley Tombs Guide For First Time Visitors

Brú na Bóinne (Palace of the Boyne) or popularly known as the Boyne Valley tombs are passage tombs located near River Boyne, 8 km west of Drogheda, County Meath.

The site covers over 780 hectares where the majority of the monuments are located on the north side of the river.

Brú na Bóinne: The Boyne Valley Tombs Guide For First Time Visitors

Bru na Boinne contains one of the most important prehistoric landscapes in the world dating back to the Neolithic period. It is famous for its Megalithic passage tombs called Knowth, Newgrange, and Dowth.

Aside from these three spectacular ancient sites, there are over 90 Neolithic monuments dotted across Brú na Bóinne.

A UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1993, this famous River Boyne Valley is considered one of the best attractions in Ireland.

Things to see in Bru na Boinne

Newgrange

newgrange passage tomb

Newgrange was built during the Neolithic period, around 3200 BC. This means it is older than Stonehenge and the Egyptian pyramids. It is a large kidney-shaped mound covering an area of over one acre, retained at the base by 97 kerbstones. Some of these kerbstones are decorated with megalithic art.

Newgrange is also popular during the winter solstice. During winter solstice dawn, the sun shines on the roof-box of the passage tomb which illuminates the floor of the main chamber. It is said to be the oldest astronomically orientated structure in the world.

The winter solstice experience is done yearly and it’s only limited to a few people. Selection of the visitors is done based on a lottery. For more information on the lottery, click here.

Knowth

knowth passage tomb

Knowth, on the other hand, is a 5000-year-old mound in which the western passage ends in a rectangular chamber.

Like Newgrange, the mound is encircled by 127 kerbstones decorated with megalithic art. The Knowth site also contains one-third of all the megalithic art in all Western Europe, with over 200 decorated stones were found during excavations at Knowth.

Dowth

Dowth Passage Tomb

Dowth is one of the three principal tombs of the Boyne Valley. Unlike Newgrange and Knowth, Dowth creation is unknown, but the features of the tomb aligned with the other passage tombs which date approximately between 3200 and 2900 BC.

It is also less developed as a tourist attraction than its neighbors because of its lower chamber and the decoration is less visible compared to others.

Archaeologists classified Newgrange, Knowth, and Dowth as passage tombs, however, these tombs are now recognized to be much more than passage tombs. 

Ancient Temple is a more fitting classification, which is a place of astrological, spiritual, religious, and ceremonial importance.

Brú na Bóinne Opening Hours

February – April: Daily 09.30 – 17.30

May: Daily 09.00 – 18.30

June – Mid September: Daily 09.00 – 19.00

Mid – End September: Daily 09.00 – 18.30

October: Daily 09.30 – 17.30

November – January: Daily 09.00 – 17.00

Brú na Bóinne Admission Fee

There are different admission fees depending on the attraction you want to see. Please note that Dowth is not officially included on the tour to Boyne Valley.

However, visitors can go on their own to Dowth through private transportation.

A. Exhibition

Duration:  1 hour

Adult: €4.00

Sen/Group: €3.00

Child/Student: €3.00

Family: €10.00

B. Exhibition and Newgrange

Duration: 2 hours

Adult: €7.00

Sen/Group: €6.00

Child/Student: €4.00

Family: €16.00

C. Exhibition and Knowth

Duration: 2 hours

Adult: €6.00

Sen/Group: €4.00

Child/Student: €4.00

Family: €14.00

D. Exhibition and Newgrange and Knowth

Duration: 3 hours

Adult: €13.00

Sen/Group: €10.00

Child/Student: €8.00

Family: €30.00

How to get to Brú na Bóinne from Dublin

Knowth Brú na Bóinne

Brú na Bóinne is only less than 40 km from the city which makes it one of the most popular day trips from Dublin.

There are several ways to get to Boyne Valley.

Through private car

Depending on which area of Dublin you’re in, you can head to M1. Drive from M1 to Meath and then take exit 9 from M1. Then follow Donore Rd and then turn right to Staleen Rd. Then turn right again and you will see the entrance to Brú na Bóinne.

Through Uber or Taxi

You can simply book an Uber or take a taxi to Boyne Valley tombs. Taking an Uber might cost you between €95-€130 and €75-€90 for Taxi.

Through Train

Take a train from Connolly Station (Irish Rail) to Drogheda. Trains leave every hour and it takes an hour to get to Drogheda. Train fare is between €9-€14 for one way. Then from Drogheda station, take a taxi to Brú na Bóinne. This might cost between €14-€17 for an almost 9km trip.

Through group tours

There are several companies that offer tours to Brú na Bóinne from Dublin.

The best thing about these tours is you can also combine Boyne Valley tombs with other attractions in the area such as the imposing Slane Castle and Trim Castle, Navan, and other attractions in the Drogheda area.

You can check the tours below:

Newgrange, Slane Castle, and Trim Castle tour (€35 per person) and Boyne Valley, Trim Castle & Drogheda Tour (49 per person) are both good deals. But if you are traveling with friends, this private tour of Boyne Valley and Trim Castle Day Tour might be a better option.

 

 

Contact Information

Location: Brú na Bóinne Visitor Centre, Donore, Meath

Email: brunaboinne@opw.ie

Phone: +353 41 9880300

For hotel deals around Boyne Valley, use the search bar below.



Booking.com


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BRU NA BOINNE (TIPS AND GUIDE FOR FIRST-TIME VISITORS) | IRELAND TRAVEL GUIDE | IRELAND TRAVEL DESTINATIONS | THINGS TO DO IN IRELAND #ireland #europe #travel #boynevalleytombs #brunaboinne

Is Ireland Safe? What You Need To Know (2021)

Is Ireland safe for tourists? This is one of the most common questions that travelers ask before visiting the country. Read on to find out what you need to know about staying safe in Ireland. 

Is Ireland Safe? What You Need To Know

cliffs of moher tour and tips

Located in northwestern Europe in the Atlantic, Ireland is politically divided into two parts since 1920.

These are the Republic of Ireland, an Independent State, and Northern Ireland which is part of the United Kingdom. 

There is plenty to see and do for tourists in Ireland, a place known for its natural wonders and long history.

From its predominantly green landscapes to the dramatic coastlines, Ireland has something for every type of traveler.

Ireland’s diverse and fascinating cities are a must experience as well, and part of every traveler’s experience in any country is its safety.

With its rather turbulent history, how safe is Ireland, really? Should there be more precautions apart from using one’s common sense? 

Is Ireland a safe place to visit? 

O'Connell Street Dublin

Compared to many countries in Europe and around the world, Ireland is a very safe country to visit.

There is a relatively low crime rate in Ireland and most of them are alcohol-induced. Tourists are advised to avoid walking the streets of Ireland late at night, particularly in the major cities.  

According to the 2020 Vision of Humanity Global Peace Index, Ireland is the 12th most “peaceful” nation in the world.

This ranking was based on each country’s societal safety and security, domestic and international conflict, and the degree of militarization. This ranking shows that Ireland is generally not a dangerous country, making it a safe place to be in especially for travelers. 

As in most countries, however, the greatest danger to tourists in Ireland are thieves like pickpockets and scammers who use bustling crowds as a cover.

Pickpocketing and bag-snatching do happen more in populated and touristy areas in Ireland such as Dublin and Limerick.

Travelers to Ireland are also more inclined to be scammed while exploring the country – from overcharged tours to souvenirs that feel more like highway robbery. 

Given all these facts, here are more details regarding safety in Ireland for every type of traveler. 

Is Ireland safe for solo travelers?

As long as they exercise basic precautions such as being alert and calling less attention to themselves – Ireland is a safe place to visit for solo travelers. 

Is Ireland safe for female travelers?

As in every country, sexual assault does occur in Ireland.  The risk for female travelers maybe low, but it is still best to be cautious to lessen the chances of an encounter. Female tourists should always try to stick with a group, especially at night.

Avoid hitchhiking, drinking heavily, and never take drugs. If confronted, followed, or stalked, dial 112 to call the police. 

Is Ireland safe for LGBTQ+ Travelers?

In Ireland, it is prohibited by law to discriminate against people based on their sexual orientation.

The LGBTQ+ are mostly safe to travel around Ireland because they are protected by the Criminal Law Act of 1993.

Ireland’s attitude towards the gay community is among the most commendable in the world. In the event of harassment or violence, however, calls the LGBT Ireland Helpline at 1890 929 539.

General safety tips on the street

Sightseeing bus Belfast

Here are some basic precautions that travelers to Ireland must practice for a hassle-free and safe visit: 

1. After a night out, it is best to take the train, bus, or cab to go back to your accommodation. This way, you will also lessen the risk of encountering intoxicated people who might start a fight. 

2. Be careful when asking for directions, There are cases of overly friendly people who, instead of giving directions, led tourists to a secluded street. The tourists were then mugged, sometimes with a weapon. Ask store owners or clerks, security guards or if you see one nearby, ask the police instead. 

3. Like in most countries and in any tourist destination, pickpockets also operate in Ireland. However, they are usually in overly crowded areas such as train stations and popular landmarks. 

Pickpockets also operate, like in any tourist destination, but they usually rally in larger cities, and around crowded places such as railway and train stations or popular tourist landmarks. Be careful with your belongings and don’t wear jewelry, gadgets, or anything that could attract thieves. 

General safety tips when driving in Ireland

Travel Scenery Countryside Ireland Road Ireland

Ireland is known as a country with the safest roads in Europe.  These roads are often well-kept and safe for driving.

However, this is not always true in rural areas. Aside from being narrow and winding, rural roads have potholes that are often left unfixed for weeks.

Drivers are advised to be very careful when navigating countryside roads to avoid accidents. 

General safety tips when exploring Ireland

From rugged coastlines and dramatic cliffs to lush mountain ranges, Ireland is a haven for nature lovers. Bike, hike, surf, and swim safely with these useful reminders. 

1. The stunning sea cliffs of Ireland from the Cliffs of Moher to the Slieve League are among the country’s most visited attractions, but they are also dangerous.

These places have warnings if certain cliff paths are unstable so stay away from them. Do not try from the designated path, and do not get close to cliff edges. 

2. Ireland’s stunning scenery attracts any cyclists but since there are not a lot of dedicated bike lanes, it can be quite dangerous.

To be safe, bring your bikes and explore in places that have “Greenway”, smooth tracks reserved for cycling and walking.

Some Greenway with the best sceneries are The Galway-Moycullen Greenway in County Galway, The Glenbeigh Greenway in County Kerry, The Great Western Greenway in County Mayo, and Waterford Greenway in County Waterford.

3. Ireland is surrounded by seas and oceans, and it has been known as one of the best surfing destinations in the world.

Getting in the water whether to swim or surf can be tempting, so remember to wear a thick wetsuit. The Irish waters are significantly colder than most of us are used to. Buy or hire a thicker neoprene wetsuit to protect the skin from the jarring cold. 

4. Ireland’s diverse and scenic landscapes are ideal for hiking, which is one of the best things to do here.

However, Ireland is also notorious for its fickle weather. Keep safe from the elements by wearing and packing clothes that are suitable for all weathers.

Bring a backpack that contains a scarf, umbrella, and a waterproof jacket. Always wear slip-proof boots to avoid accidents while navigating Ireland’s most rugged landscapes. 

General safety reminders in cities across Ireland

grafton street dublin

Is Dublin safe to visit? 

Dublin is a friendly city, but there are parts of it that should be avoided during certain times of the day. These are areas notoriously known for pickpockets, drug-related crime, and violence.

If possible, try to avoid the Temple Bar area and the shopping district around the Spire monument.

Temple Bar is prone to alcohol and drug-fueled violence, while pickpockets and other dodgy people hang around the Spire.

Is Belfast safe to visit? 

Belfast may have had a history of unrest but over the years, it has consistently ranked as one of the cities with low crime rates.

However, it is still beat to use the same street smarts you would anywhere, such as watching your belongings or being wary of overly friendly strangers.  

Cork and Limerick

When traveling to other cities such as Cork and Limerick, avoid certain areas especially those near the housing projects.

When in Cork, try to steer clear of the Ballinderry Park while in Limerick, it is best to not go to districts like Perry Square, behind People’s Park. If you can help it, avoid walking along these streets late at night.

Ireland Bucket List: 50+ Top Things To Do In Ireland For 2021

There are so many things to do in Ireland. This country might be small but it’s packed with history, amazing landscapes, imposing castles, and activities that you can add to your Ireland bucket list

With this, it is easy to get overwhelmed by the long list of activities in Ireland.

I remember the first time I’ve learned about Ireland. It was through awesome Irish bands who made names in the international scene.

Although my love for music is replaced by my love for travel, my fascination with Ireland remains the same.

So here are the best places to see in Ireland and why it’s worth visiting this country.


Ireland Bucket List: 50+ Awesome Things To Do In Ireland

Ireland Bucket List 1: Be amazed by the natural beauty and landscapes in Ireland.

1. Cliffs of Moher

cliffs of moher tour and tips

The Cliffs of Moher are sea cliffs located in County Clare, Ireland.  It is one of Ireland’s most spectacular sights and one of the most visited attractions in Ireland with 1.5 million visitors annually. Any Ireland bucket list is not complete without the Cliffs of Moher. 

Standing 702ft above the ground at their highest point and 8km long, Cliffs of Moher boasts one of the most amazing views in Ireland. On a good day, you can see the Aran Islands in Galway Bay.

To learn more about Cliffs of Moher, click here

2.Wicklow Mountains National Park

Wicklow Mountains national park

Wicklow Mountains National Park is the largest national park in Ireland with an area covering more than 129,500 square kilometers.  It is also the only one located in the east of the country.

It extends from County Wicklow and a small area of Dublin which makes it one of the best day trips from Dublin.

The park contains a variety of attractions that include lush forests, fields, and mountains, and the historical Glendalough Valley.

Check out our guide for the National Parks In Ireland For First Time Visitors here

3. Glendalough Upper Lake

Glendalough Upper Lake Ireland

Glendalough is a glacial lake in the Wicklow Mountains. It is classified as a ribbon lake which means, it is a long and narrow lake formed in a glacial trough. The lake is one of the main attractions in Wicklow Mountains National Parks.

Along with the lower lake, the valley of these twin lakes has drawn a lot of visitors and it’s one of the favorite day trips from Dublin.

Aside from the lake, the Monastic Settlement which has the round tower, St Kevin’s Church, St Kevin’s Cross and the Cathedral are also among the main attractions.

Check out our guide for The Best Lakes In Ireland here

4. Skellig Michael

Skellig Michael things to do in ireland

Skellig Michael is a twin-pinnacled rugged cliff that lies 12 km off the coast of Portmagee in South West Kerry. Rising majestically from the sea, Skellig Michael towers 714ft. (218 meters) above sea level.

On the summit of this awe-inspiring rock, you will find a remarkably well preserved 6th-century monastic settlement. This is one of the best things to see in Ireland and a visit to this major tourist attraction may well be the highlight of your holiday.

5. Assaranca Waterfall – Ardara, Donegal

 

 
 
 
 
 
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If you’re headed to the quaint fishing town of Killybegs in County Donegal, you won’t miss this beautiful surprise just off the side of the road.

The picturesque Assaranca waterfall is found on your way to the stunning Maghera caves. Stop and admire the winding cascades and take a moment to just enjoy the serene atmosphere.

Seeing this waterfall won’t even cost you hours of hiking so stop, rest for a while and take lots of photos! 

Check out this guide for the Best Waterfalls In Ireland. 


Ireland Bucket List 2: Visit the castles in Ireland.

6.Blarney Castle

blarney castle

One of Ireland’s most popular attractions is Blarney castle. It was built nearly six hundred years ago by Cormac MacCarthy, one of Ireland’s greatest chieftains. Surrounding the castle are extensive gardens.

Aside from the castle itself, the place is also popular because of Blarney Stone. In order to get the gift of eloquence, for over 200 years many famous people from around the world visit Blarney to kiss the famous Blarney Stone.

7. Kilkenny Castle

kilkenny castle ireland

Kilkenny Castle was built in 1195 to control a fording-point of the River Nore and the junction of several routeways. It was a symbol of Norman occupation and it is an important site to the history of Kilkenny. In 1967, the Castle was transferred to the people of Kilkenny for £50.

The Kilkenny Castle is now one of the very few castles in Ireland that offer tours to the public. The garden and park in the castle complex are also open to the public.

8. Kylemore Castle

kylemore abbey castle

Kylemore Castle was built by Mitchell Henry, a wealthy doctor from England, as a gift to his wife Margaret in 1871. It was sold to the Duke and Duchess of Manchester in 1903 and was then purchased by the Irish Benedictine nuns in 1920.

Kylemore Abbey, a Benedictine monastery was then founded in 1920 on the grounds of Kylemore Castle, in Connemara. Since the 1970s, the estate has been opened to the public.

Nestled at the base of Druchruach Mountain and along the shore of Lough Pollacappul in Connemara, the Abbey is one of the most iconic attractions in Ireland. It is also one of the most beautiful castles in Ireland. And no visit to Ireland is complete without spending a half-day to the castle ground.

Check out this Kylemore Abbey Tour article for more information.

9.The Rock of Cashel

Rock of Cashel

The Rock of Cashel, also known as Cashel of the Kings and St. Patrick’s Rock, is a historic site located at Cashel in County Tipperary. It is one of the most spectacular attractions in Ireland and also one of the most visited castles in Ireland.

This iconic landmark was the seat of the High Kings of Munster and was built between the 12th to the 13th century.

10. Dunluce Castle

Dunluce Castle is now a ruined medieval castle in Northern Ireland. It is located on the edge of rocks on the coast of County Antrim.  Richard Óg de Burgh, 2nd Earl of Ulster, built the first castle in Dunluce. From then on, this Irish castle witnessed a long and tumultuous history between Scotland, Ireland, and the UK.

Dunluce Castle is also said to be the inspiration for Cair Paravel, the fictional castle in Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis. It is also the film location of Game of Thrones for the Seat of House Greyjoy of the great castle of Pyke.

Check out our guide for The 15 Must-See Castles In Ireland here


Ireland Bucket List 3: Explore the ancient sites in Ireland.

11. Brú na Bóinne

Knowth Brú na Bóinne

Brú na Bóinne (Palace of the Boyne) or popularly known as the Boyne Valley tombs are passage tombs located near River Boyne, 8 km west of Drogheda, County Meath.

The site covers over 780 hectares where the majority of the monuments are located on the north side of the river.

Bru na Boinne contains one of the most important prehistoric landscapes in the world dating back to the Neolithic period. It is famous for its Megalithic passage tombs called Knowth, Newgrange, and Dowth.

Aside from these three spectacular ancient sites, there are over 90 Neolithic monuments dotted across Brú na Bóinne.

A UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1993, this famous River Boyne Valley is considered one of the best attractions in Ireland.

To learn more about Brú na Bóinne, click here

12. Hill of Tara

Hill of Tara

The Hill of Tara is an archaeological complex in County Meath of Ireland. It is located near the River of Boyne and it runs between Dunshaughlin and Navan. Hill of Tara used to be the seat of the kings during Stone Age.

It contains a number of ancient passages tombs, Ireland’s Stonehenge, and historical ruins.

For more things to do in Meath, click here

13. Giant’s Causeway

The Giant’s Causeway is an area of about 40,000 interlocking basalt columns, the result of an ancient volcanic fissure eruption.

It is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and a national nature reserve. It is located in Northern Ireland and it is about a 3-4 hour drive from Dublin in a private car.

Admission Fee

Access to the Giant’s Causeway is free however the visitor center charges £12.50 per adult and £31.00 for a family of 4.

14. Fahan beehive huts

Visit the Fahan Beehive Huts of Dingle in Kerry and step into pre-historic Ireland.

They were built in the form of a circle of successive strata of stone, each stratum lying a little closer to the center than the one beneath.

No mortar was used to build these beehive huts by using the corbelling process. These huts dated back to the 12th century and they stand along the panoramic Slead Head drive.

For more things to do in Dingle, click here. 

15. Kenmare Stone Circle

Known locally as The Shrubberies this is one of the largest stone circles in southwest Ireland measuring 17.4 x 15.8m and it is the only egg-shaped stone circle in Munster province.

These Stone Circles in Kenmare were built during the bronze age believed to be used for ritual and ceremonial purposes.

For more things to do in Kenmare, click here


Ireland Bucket List 4: Learn history from awesome museums in Ireland.

16. Kilmainham Gaol, Ireland

Kilmainham Gaol museum

This symbol of Irish Nationalism was formerly a jail that got transformed into a museum over the course of history. The 300 years old building has a soul of its own and you can feel it in the chapels, cells, and grounds of Kilmainham Gaol. The museum gives a deep insight into the struggle that the country had to go through in the past.

17. EPIC the Irish Emigration Museum

The Irish Emigration Museum tells tales of the 10 million people who had to emigrate from Ireland for the sake of earning more or to find new opportunities. Ten million uprooted lives and 10 million stories, that’s what you get to see in this ethereal place.

18. Irish Potato Famine Exhibition

This museum brings before us the pain and suffering of the people in The Great Hunger. The seasonal museum is well worth a visit if you are planning a visit to Dublin.

19. Glasnevin Cemetery Museum

The 1.5 million people buried in the Glasnevin Cemetery and their artistically designed graves are there for you to search the lineage of old Irish people. A walking tour can be a great venture for tourists.

To learn more about the best museums in Dublin, click here

20. Donegal County Museum

Letterkenny’s 19th-century workhouse, built to provide Famine relief, now houses the local museum. The permanent collection offers 8000-plus artifacts from prehistoric times onwards.

This county museum in Letterkenny, Donegal is officially recognized by the Government of Ireland as the best museum in the country.

For more things to do in Letterkenny, click here


Ireland Bucket List 5: Explore the charming towns in Ireland

There are lots of amazing towns in Ireland that you should visit at least once. 

21. Dingle

THINGS TO DO IN DINGLE IRELAND

Dingle in Ireland is a small port town in Dingle Peninsula and one of the scenic stops in Ring of Kerry along with Kenmare and Killarney. This town is known for its rugged scenery, trails, and sandy beaches.

To learn more about Dingle, click here.

22. Kinsale

kinsale ireland

Kinsale is a town in County Cork, Ireland. Originally a medieval fishing port, historic Kinsale is one of the most picturesque and historic towns on the south-west coast of Ireland.

Kinsale has a beautiful set of long waterfront, yacht-filled harbor, narrow winding streets, and brightly painted galleries, shops, and houses. It is also a leading Irish tourist attraction and the southerly starting point of the Wild Atlantic Way trail.

To learn more about Kinsale, click here.

23. Killarney

Ross Castle KILLARNEY

Killarney is a lakeshore town in the County of Kerry. It is a popular tourist destination in Ireland as it is one of the scenic stops in Ring of Kerry along with the towns of Kenmare and Dingle.

Famous for its national park, beautiful lakes, imposing castles, wildlife, and gorgeous landscapes, this town is named as one of the top 10 global tourist destinations in the world.

To learn more about Killarney, click here.

24. Cobh, Ireland

cobh ireland

Cobh was developed as a Victorian spa retreat in the mid-19th century and became Ireland’s most important port for trans-Atlantic travel.

It is known as the last port of Titanic before the tragedy struck. If you would like to create some memories that will last a lifetime, take the plunge and visit Cobh. It is a captivating town that will hold you in its spell long after you’ve left.

To learn more about Cobh, click here.

25. Kilkenny

Kilkenny is one of the most beautiful and charming Irish cities. Located in the center of Ireland, it has a charming medieval center, lively pubs, and a dynamic art scene.

Because of this, there are many unique things to do in Kilkenny, Ireland. From its majestic creeper-clad castle, a bustling crafts industry, cobbled lanes, beautiful churches, and secret passages, Kilkenny will surprise you in many ways.

To learn more about Kilkenny, click here.


Ireland Bucket List 6: Check out the lakes in Ireland.

Lough Tay Wicklow

26. Lough Ree

Lough Ree is one of the 3 lakes in the Shannon River Basin along with Lough Derg. The lake serves as a border between the counties of Longford and Westmeath and it’s a popular fishing and boating area. The boats leave from the harbor in Athlone.

27. Lough Corrib

Lough Corrib is the largest lake in the Republic of Ireland. This lake connects to the sea at Galway through River Corrib.

Aside from being a Ramsar site, it has also been designated a Special Area of Conservation. Lough Corrib has over 1300 islands scattered around the lake.

Inchagoil Island, one of the islands within the lake has views of the Maumturk range, Joyce Country, and the mountains of Connemara.

To check the best lakes in Ireland, click here


Ireland Bucket List 7: Learn from the amazing libraries in Ireland

trinity college dublin

28. Marsh’s Library

Marsh’s Library is one of the oldest public libraries in Dublin that you definitely should not miss in your itinerary.

It holds 25,000 books and 300 manuscripts where many of these are donated by an Archbishop of Dublin, Narcissus Marsh.

This library, like some other attractions in Dublin, has also witnessed much of the city’s history.

Opening Times

Daily except for Tuesday and Sunday from 9:30 am to 5 pm.

Admission Fee

Adult €3 | Student/Senior €2 | Child (U-16) free

Contact Information

Address: St Patrick’s Close, Dublin, Ireland

Email: keeper@marshlibrary.ie 

Phone:  +353 1 4543511

29. Trinity College

If you enjoy walking down memory lane, give it a shot at Trinity College where you can find a collection of Ireland’s treasured past in its Long Room Library.

This 200-foot-long room holds 200,000 books as old as you can possibly imagine. The most popular treasure in this library is the Book of Kells which has a great role in Irish identity.


Ireland Bucket List 8: Attend some of the popular Irish festivals 

St. Patrick's Day

30. St. Patrick’s Festival

The biggest and grandest festival in Ireland, St. Patrick’s Festival is one hell of a celebration that you should not miss if you’re planning to travel to Ireland.

This festival which was started by the Irish government in November 1995 eventually turned into a multi-day celebration that takes place somewhere around March 17 every year. The highlight of the festival is St. Patrick’s Day where there’s a grand parade, lots of drinking, and locals and tourists party in the streets all over Ireland.

It is a nationwide celebration where people usually dress up as Leprechauns. Spread throughout the St. Patrick’s Festival Week are various activities and events like traditional performances, food fairs, and a celebration of Irish culture.

31. Temple Bar TradFest

Late winter in Dublin is never boring because this would mean non-stop traditional Irish music and unlimited drinking sessions in Temple Bar TradFest.

Today, this festival is already considered the largest festival of traditional music in Ireland long after it started as a small niche music festival in 2006.

The recognition received from this festival has pushed it to expand its goal which now includes the promotion of the next generation of Irish musicians.

TradFest also offers a memorable experience for festival-goers with its live music concert held in some of Dublin’s popular historical sites.

Aside from that, you can also expect to party all night long for free.

Exhibitions, workshops, masterclasses, and film-screenings are also in the lineup of activities. This festival starts around January 21 and ends on January 27.


Ireland Bucket List 9: Explore the vibrant cities of the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland.

grafton street dublin

32. Dublin 

Dublin is the capital city of Ireland. The city surely has a lot to offer to tourists coming in and out of this marvelous city in Ireland.

It has everything in store for travelers of all kinds- solo, group, young or old. From museums to bars, to historical sights, Dublin is surely packed with interesting things to do

33. Belfast

Belfast is the largest city in Northern Ireland and along with its size comes with a rich historical and political background.

It is also best known for a lot of things like the Titanic and CS Lewis. All these events gave birth to a lot of Belfast tourist attractions that first-time or frequent visitors will surely don’t want to miss.

Today, there are a lot of museums and landmarks that you would want to include in your Instagram feed if you’re paying a visit.

34. Derry 

Londonderry, also popularly known as “Derry”, is the second-largest city in Northern Ireland.

Overall, it is the fourth largest city in the country. Derry is derived from an Old Irish name which means “oak grove” but aside from that, it is also known as the walled city.

In fact, it is the only remaining intact walled city in Ireland and one of the finest examples in Europe.

Londonderry is engulfed with a lot of history that is why you should not skip it when in Ireland.

35. Cork 

There are several things to do in Cork City. Cork surely has a long history behind it.

Being one of Europe’s oldest cities, Cork has gone through several developments which made it a hub for tourists nowadays. 

36. Galway 

Galway City and nothing else comes to mind if we speak about Ireland’s top destination for arts, music, and urban culture. This city on the west coast of Ireland never fails to exceed expectations- from its medieval walls down to the breathtaking view of the River Corrib.

So whether you’re coming over for a quick visit or longer, there’s just so much to enjoy in this harbor city.


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IRELAND BUCKET LIST: THINGS TO DO IN IRELAND

10 Best Day Trips From Dublin (Cost, Transport and Tips)

Dublin is an amazing city with lots of things to do. From interesting museums, awesome nightlife, imposing castles to amazing ancient sites, Dublin is a good base for your Ireland adventure. However, if you find yourself running out of things to do in this Irish capital, there are several day trips from Dublin that you can do.

Here are the 10 best day trips from Dublin.

10 Best Day Trips From Dublin, Ireland


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1. Trim Castle is one of the best day trips from Dublin

trim castle ireland

Trim Castle is a Norman castle on the south bank of River Boyne in the town of Trim and currently the largest Anglo-Norman castle in Ireland.

Built in 1173 by Hugh de Lacy, the castle was used as a center of Norman administration for the Lordship of Meath. It is also probably best known as the setting for Mel Gibson’s Braveheart. 

The castle boasts imposing twenty-sided towers protected by curtain wall and moat. It was a great example of experimental military architecture during its period. If you want to learn more about the legacy of this castle, this day trip from Dublin is a must.

Admission Fee

€5 per adult, €3 for students, and €13 for a family of 4. It includes access to the Trim Castle grounds and an audio-visual show at the visitor center. You can get the ticket from the visitor center.

How to get to Trim Castle from Dublin

If you don’t have a car, you can take the Bus Éireann (#111) from Busaras station in Dublin to Delvin (Opp Gaffneys) and get off in Trim Castle.

It takes about an hour or you can take the Bus Éireann (#109B) to Knightsbrook Hotel and get off at Opp Boyne Bridge By-Pass in Trim. This takes a bit longer than Delvin by 10-15 minutes.

From the bus stop, take a walk towards the castle entrance. It’s about 500 meters from both bus stops and it takes about 5 minutes. The bus fare is about €10-12 one-way or €20-24 for a round trip and they have buses that leave every hour.

Or you can check out this tour for €40 which includes Trim Castle, Boyne Valley, and Slane Castle. Which is a steal given that it includes transport and admission fees!

 

 

Recommended hours for the day trip

6 hours. You have 3 hours for the journey and 3 hours to explore the castle and the surrounding area.

Opening Hours

Grounds open only at this site and free admission

Feb 8th – March 16th

09.30 – 16.30

March 17th – Sept 30th

10.00 – 17.00

Oct 1st – Oct 31st

09.30 – 16.30

Nov 1st – Nov 4th

09.00 – 16.00 (Weekends Only)

Contact Information

Location: Trim, Co Meath

Phone: +353 46 943 8619

Email:  trimcastle@opw.ie 

2. Wicklow Mountains National Park

Wicklow Mountains national park

Wicklow Mountains National Park is the largest national park in Ireland with an area covering more than 129,500 square kilometers.  It is also the only one located in the east of the country. It extends from County Wicklow and a small area of Dublin.

It’s not that far from the city center and it’s one of the best day trips from Dublin. 

The park contains a variety of attractions that include lush forests, fields, and mountains, and the historical Glendalough Valley. Glendalough features early medieval monastic structures and Glendalough lakes.

Admission Fee

Admission is free to the national park.

How to get Wicklow Mountains National Park from Dublin

Without a car, going to Wicklow Mountains National Park from Dublin is expensive and much more complicated.

You can take a bus from Portobello, Richmond Street Sth (Lennox Street) bus stop to Poolbeg Street – Valleymount Road through Dublin Bus #65 and get off in County Wicklow, Valleymount Road. This costs about €10 for about 1.5 hours.

Then take a taxi to the Wicklow Mountains National Park which costs between €35-50 for half an hour ride.

Or you can take this day tour for €35 per person including Wicklow Mountain, Glendalough & Kilkenny. It also includes pick-up and dropoff in Dublin which will save you over €80 for transportation alone.

 

Recommended hours for the day trip

Allocate between 7-8 hours so you have ample time to explore the national park.

Opening Hours

The park is open at all times but the visitor center is only open from May to September daily between 10 am to 5:30 pm. From October to April during weekends from 10 am to 4:30 pm. If you are planning to stay in the park, for more information click here.

Contact Information

Location: Wicklow Mountains National Park, Kilafin, Laragh, via Bray, Co. Wicklow A98 K286

Email: wmnp@ahg.gov.ie

Phone: +353 761 002667

3. Rock of Cashel Day Trip from Dublin

Rock of Cashel

The Rock of Cashel, also known as Cashel of the Kings and St. Patrick’s Rock, is a historic site located at Cashel in County Tipperary. It is one of the most spectacular attractions in Ireland and also one of the most visited.

This iconic landmark was the seat of the High Kings of Munster and was built between the 12th to the 13th century.

Admission Fee

Adult: €8.00

Group / Senior: €6.00

Child / Student : €4.00

Family: €20.00

How to get to Rock of Cashel from Dublin

Take the Dublin Airport – Cork Parnell Place bus (Bus Eireann #X8) from Outside Heuston Train Station to Main St. Get off at Main St and walk for about 10 minutes (800m) towards the entrance of Rock of Cashel.

The bus ride takes about 2 hours and it costs about €24-29 one way or €48-58 for a round trip. The bus also leaves every 4 hours so plan accordingly.

Or you can take this day tour for €75 per person which includes a trip to Rock of Cashel, Cahir Castle, and Cork City. This will give you an option to plan your time better and explore more places.

 

Recommended hours for the day trip

Allocate between 7-8 hours so you have ample time to travel and explore the Rock of Cashel.

Opening Hours

9 am to 4:30 pm during winter and 9 am to 7 pm during the summer.

Contact Information

Location: Rock of Cashel, Moor, Cashel, Co. Tipperary, Ireland

Phone: 062 61437

Email: rockofcashel@opw.ie

4. Blarney Castle is one of the best day trips from Dublin

blarney castle

One of Ireland’s most popular attractions is Blarney Castle located in Blarney, County Cork. Built nearly six hundred years ago by one of Ireland’s greatest chieftains, Cormac MacCarthy. 

Surrounding the castle are extensive gardens. There are paths touring the grounds with signs pointing out the various attractions such as several natural rock formations and beautiful gardens.

Aside from the castle itself, the place is also popular because of Blarney Stone.

In order to get the gift of eloquence, for over 200 years many famous people from around the world climb the stairs to kiss the famous Blarney Stone.

There is an ongoing debate over the story of the Blarney Stone but no one has been able to prove the origin of the stone.

Admission Fee

€16 for adults, €13 for students and seniors, and €40 for the family. 

How to get to Blarney Castle from Dublin

The fastest way to get to Blarney Castle using public transportation is through the train and then bus. However, it will have few connections.

Take the Irish Rail from Dublin to Cork Kent (about 2.5 hours for €45-65). Get off at Cork Kent and then take a bus from Kent Station to CIT Campus and get off at St. Patrick Street (O2 Store).

It’s a short trip for 8 minutes (€3-5) and then take another bus from St. Patrick St (Drawbridge St Jctn) to Blarney Village. The bus trip is about 30 minutes for €5-6.

Then walk from Blarney village to Blarney Castle for another 7 minutes. In total, transportation might cost between €53-76 for one way trip and it might take between 3.5 to 4 hours of journey.

Or you can take this day tour for just €50 per person which includes Blarney Castle, the gardens, and shortstops in Cork City and Rock of Cashel.

 

Recommended hours for the day trip

Allocate between 11-12  hours so you have ample time to travel and explore Blarney Castle.

Opening Hours

9 am to 5 pm

Contact Information

Location: Blarney, Cork, Ireland

Phone: +353 21 4385252

Email: info@blarneycastle.ie

5. Giant’s Causeway and Game of Thrones filming locations

dark hedges northern ireland

The Giant’s Causeway is an area of about 40,000 interlocking basalt columns, the result of an ancient volcanic fissure eruption.

It is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and a national nature reserve. It is located in Northern Ireland and it is about a 3-4 hour drive from Dublin on a rental car.

Game of Thrones grew in popularity for the past 7 years. The TV series focuses on medieval realism which shows several medieval and exotic locations. These locations also grew in popularity that tours to these locations have become coveted by loyal fans.

In Northern Ireland alone, there are over 10 locations where you can experience Game of Thrones in real life.

Admission Fee

Access to the Giant’s Causeway is free however the visitor center charges £12.50 per adult and £31.00 for a family of 4.

How to get to Giant’s Causeway from Dublin

Using public transportation, it might take between 6-7 hours to get to the Giant’s Causeway. The fastest option is by taking a train to Northern Ireland and then a bus.

Take a train from Connolly to Belfast City Centre in Lanyon Place Train Station. This takes about 2 hours and can cost between €30-45 one way. Transfer to Belfast Central station and take a train to Coleraine station. It takes about a 1.5-hour ride for €10-14.

And from Coleraine Bus Station, take a Translink UK bus to Aird Giants Causeway The Nook. It’s about a half-hour ride for €4-7. Then walk towards Giant’s Causeway. Giant’s Causeway is about 1.5km from the bus stop.

Or you can save yourself a massive headache by taking this day tour for half the price. The tour includes Giant’s Causeway and the filming locations of Game of Thrones.

 

Recommended hours for the day trip

16 hours at least.

Opening Hours

The opening hours vary depending on the season. For updated opening hours, click here.

Contact Information

Location: 44 Causeway Road Bushmills County Antrim BT57 8SU Northern Ireland

Phone: (028) 2073 1855

Email: giantscausewaytic@nationaltrust.org

6. The Cliffs of Moher is one of the best day trips from Dublin

cliffs of moher tour and tips

The Cliffs of Moher are sea cliffs located in County Clare, Ireland. It is one of Ireland’s most spectacular sights and one of the most visited attractions in Ireland with 1.5 million visitors annually.

Standing 702ft above the ground at their highest point and 8km long, the Cliffs boast one of the most amazing views in Ireland. On a good day, you can see the Aran Islands in Galway Bay.

Cliffs of Moher is one of the best day trips from Dublin and a day tour from Galway.

Admission Fee

For a complete list of the admission fees, click here.

How to get to Cliffs of Moher from Dublin

Cliffs of Moher is over 266 kilometers from Dublin. If you don’t have a car, you can take 2 connecting buses that go directly to Cliffs of Moher.

From Burgh Quay, Dublin City South, you can take a Bus Dublin Coach to Dunnes, Friars Walk. This takes about 3.5 hours for €20-25 one way. 

And then from Friars Walk, walk to Ennis Bus Station to take a bus that goes to Cliffs of Moher Visitor Centre. This takes about an hour for €9-11 a trip. Then from the bus stop, just walk about 5 minutes to get to the entrance of the visitor center.

There’s also a Citylink bus from Temple Bar, Crampton Quay that goes to Cliffs of Moher via Gmit. Travel time and bus fare are almost the same.

Or you can also take this day tour from Dublin that only cost half of the transportation. It also includes a shortstop to Galway and Burren.

 

Recommended hours for the day trip

It might take 6 hours one way to just get to the cliffs so it’s better to allocate at least 14 hours to enjoy the place.

Opening Hours

8 am to 7 pm although, during winter, the cliffs are closed by 5 pm.

Contact Information

Location: Lislorkan North, Liscannor, Co. Clare, Ireland

Phone: bookings@cliffsofmoher.ie

Email: +353 65 708 6145

7. Kilkenny Castle and the city

kilkenny castle ireland

Kilkenny Castle was built in 1195 to control a fording-point of the River Nore and the junction of several routeways. It was a symbol of Norman occupation and it is an important site to the history of Kilkenny.

In 1967, the Castle was transferred to the people of Kilkenny for £50. The Kilkenny Castle is now one of the very few castles in Ireland that offer tours to the public. The garden and park in the castle complex are also open to the public.

The city of Kilkenny is one of the most beautiful and charming Irish cities. Located in the center of Ireland, it has a charming medieval center, lively pubs, and a dynamic art scene.

Because of this, there are many unique things to do in Kilkenny, Ireland. From its majestic creeper-clad castle, a bustling crafts industry, cobbled lanes, beautiful churches, and secret passages, Kilkenny will surprise you in many ways.

Admission Fee

Adult € 8.00 | child € 4.00 | Family € 20.00

How to get to Kilkenny from Dublin

From Dublin, you can take the bus that goes directly to Kilkenny from Dublin City South, Burgh Quay station. It takes almost 2 hours for €6 – €10 for Dublin Coach or €11 – €14 for Eurobus. They have buses that leave every 3 hours so plan accordingly.

From Kilkenny, Ormond Road bus stop, you can easily walk for 5-10 minutes to go to the castle. You can also take a train from Heuston station to Kilkenny MacDonagh station. This takes about the same time as the buses but more expensive at €23- €35 for a one-way trip.

Then walk from the station to the town center and the castle.

Or you can take this day trip to Kilkenny and Wicklow Mountain for only €25 per person. 

 

Recommended hours for the day trip

Allocate at least 7 hours to fully enjoy the trip.

Opening Hours

Daily from 9 am to 5:30 pm

Contact Information

Address: The Parade, Collegepark, Kilkenny, Ireland

Phone: +353 56 770 4106

Email: bookingskilkennycastle@opw.ie

8. Howth is one of the best day trips from Dublin

howth ireland

Below the hilly headland at the northern boundary of Dublin Bay lies the small fishing village of Howth. It is only a half-hour drive from Dublin which makes it one of the most convenient day trips from Dublin.

There are so many things to do in Howth which includes a castle, hiking trails, amazing seafood, and a charming coastal village.

Admission Fee

Depending on the activity, it is free sightseeing around the village but the Castle has an admission fee. For any booking information to the castle, click here.

How to get to Howth from Dublin

You can reach Howth using DART which is a fast train service from Dublin’s city center. Return ticket costs €4.70 from Connolly, Tara, or Pearse stations in the City Centre and is valid for one day. There are trains every 15 minutes.

Or you can take this day trip to Howth from Dublin.

 

Recommended hours for the day trip

4-5 hours should suffice to explore the highlights of Howth village.

9. Castletown House is one of the best day trips from Dublin

Castletown House Ireland

Located in County Kildare, Castletown House and Gardens is Ireland’s largest and earliest Palladian-style estate. It was built between 1722 and 1729 for William Connolly, speaker of the Irish House of Commons and the wealthiest commoner in Ireland.

You can explore the parklands, the river walk, the temple, and the garden inside the estate. The grounds of the estate are accessible to the public for free but there’s an admission fee inside the house and one must book in advance.

Admission Fee

€10.00 for adults, free for children below 12, €5.00 for 12-17 years old, and €25.00 for a family of 4.

How to get to Castletown House from Dublin

Take a Bus Eireann bus (#120) from Dublin, Halfpenny Bridge to Celbridge, Celbridge. This takes about 30 minutes. Then walk from Celbridge bus stop to Castletown House for 15-20 minutes. Bus fare is between €6-8.

You can also get this Dublin pass to give you an access to over 30 attractions around Dublin. 

 

Recommended hours for the day trip

4 hours should suffice which makes it one of the best half-day tours from Dublin.

Opening Hours

10 am to 6 pm but it closes earlier in winter. To get the updated schedule, click here.

Contact Information

Location: Castletown House and Parklands, Celbridge, Co. Kildare, W23 V9H3

Phone: +353 1 6288252

Email: castletown@opw.ie

10. Brú na Bóinne (Boyne Valley Tombs)

Knowth Brú na Bóinne

Brú na Bóinne (Palace of the Boyne) or popularly known as the Boyne Valley tombs are passage tombs located near River Boyne, 8 km west of Drogheda. The site covers over 780 hectares where the majority of the monuments are located on the north side of the river.

It contains one of the most important prehistoric landscapes in the world dating back to the Neolithic period.

Bru na Boinne is famous for its Megalithic passage tombs called Knowth, Newgrange, and Dowth.

Admission Fee

Below is the Exhibition, Newgrange, and Knowth fee. Dowth is not officially included in the tour but visitors can check out the passage tomb through private transport

Adult: €13.00 | Sen/Group: €10.00 | Child/Student: €8.00 | Family: €30.00

How to get to Brú na Bóinne from Dublin

Brú na Bóinne is only less than 40 km from the city which makes it one of the most popular day tours from Dublin.

There are several ways to get to Brú na Bóinne.

Through Uber or Taxi

You can simply book an Uber or take a taxi to Boyne Valley tombs. Taking an Uber might cost you between €95-€130 and €75-€90 for Taxi.

Through Train

Take a train from Connolly Station (Irish Rail) to Drogheda. Trains leave every hour and it takes an hour to get to Drogheda. Train fare is between €9-€14 for one way.

Then from Drogheda station, take a taxi to Brú na Bóinne in Drogheda. This might cost between €14-€17 for an almost 9km trip.

Through group tours

There are several companies that offer tours to Brú na Bóinne from Dublin.

The best thing about these tours is you can also combine Boyne Valley tombs with other attractions in the area such as the imposing Slane Castle and Trim Castle, Navan, and other attractions in the Drogheda area.

You can check the tours below:

Newgrange, Slane Castle, and Trim Castle tour (€35 per person) and Boyne Valley, Trim Castle & Drogheda Tour (49 per person) are both good deals. But if you are traveling with friends, this private tour of Boyne Valley and Trim Castle Day Tour might be a better option.

 

 

Recommended hours for the day trip

5-6 hours

Opening Hours

February – April: Daily 09.30 – 17.30

May: Daily 09.00 – 18.30

June – Mid September: Daily 09.00 – 19.00

Mid – End September: Daily 09.00 – 18.30

October: Daily 09.30 – 17.30

November – January: Daily 09.00 – 17.00

Contact Information for Brú na Bóinne

Location: Brú na Bóinne Visitor Centre, Donore, Meath

Email: brunaboinne@opw.ie

Phone: +353 41 9880300

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12 Best Towns And Cities In Ireland To Visit

The lush green isle of Ireland is one of the most scenic countries in the world. And when visiting, one simply doesn’t just see the major cities or the most popular attractions but also the beautiful towns in the countryside of Ireland. 

12 Best Towns And Cities In Ireland To Visit

There’s more to this country than its bustling capital, and a visit to a small town or two will definitely show anyone just how breathtaking Ireland can be.

From picturesque port towns to intriguing medieval villages and favorite stops in a scenic route, here are some of the most beautiful and best towns and cities in Ireland to visit. 

Best Towns In Cork, Ireland

1. Cobh, Co. Cork

cobh ireland

The quaint and quirky seaport town of Cobh is best known as the Titanic’s last port call in Europe before its fateful maiden voyage.

It has witnessed other significant events in Ireland’s history, particularly those that involved mass migrations during war and conflict, with most of its people sailing to Australia or North America. 

Along Cobh’s waterfront, you’ll see pretty cottages straight out of storybooks, complementing the prominent spire of the beautiful St. Colman’s Cathedral.

The fascinating Heritage Center will tell you more about the town’s intriguing history, while a stroll along the promenade, feeding the ducks in the Cuskinny, or high tea at the St. Benedict’s Priory Bible Garden and Tea Rooms are also great ways to experience this charming Irish town. 

READ MORE: 12 BEST THINGS TO DO IN COBH, IRELAND

2. Kinsale, Co. Cork

kinsale ireland

One simply cannot resist Kinsale, a town on the southern coast of Ireland, in County Cork.

With its historic streetscape and brightly colored shops, a stroll is like a walk back in time or into the pages of a storybook.

The narrow streets of Kinsale’s old town center are lined with color and history, a perfect company during a morning walk, or a late afternoon stroll.

Since it is located by the coast, Kinsale is also a fishing town where you can enjoy plenty of fresh seafood. 

Top places to visit in Kinsale include two well/preserved fortresses from the 17th century: the massive, star-shaped Charles Fort and the smaller James Fort which stands on opposite banks of the River Brandon.

There are also museums housed in beautiful historic buildings— the Kinsale Regional Museum in the town’s 16th-century courthouse and the International Museum of Wine in the Desmond Castle. 

READ MORE: 15 BEST THINGS TO DO IN KINSALE, IRELAND

Best Towns In Kerry, Ireland

3. Dingle, Co. Kerry

THINGS TO DO IN DINGLE IRELAND

Dingle is the main town in the Dingle Peninsula and is part of the breathtaking Wild Atlantic Way.

A vibrant fishing port situated at the end of the rugged Conor Pass, this town is also known for offers some of the most captivating sceneries in Ireland.

Don’t be surprised if you hear Gaelic as much as English when in Dingle, as it’s one of the few places left in the country that still speaks their native language. 

Dingle is known for its thriving pub scene, serving not only a great selection of drinks but god traditional Irish music as well.

Since it’s situated by the Atlantic, sea life in Dingle is among its top draws.

Hang out by the bay and you’d most likely spit bottlenose dolphins, including their famous resident sea mammal Fungie. 

READ MORE: 25 BEST THINGS TO DO IN DINGLE, IRELAND

4. Killarney, Co. Kerry

killarney national park

Located in the southwest of Ireland and often the start or endpoint of the breathtaking Ring of Kerry, Killarney just has to be one of those towns in Ireland that’s worth a visit.

A major attraction is the massive Killarney National Park, which is home to some of the town’s best attractions such as the Muckross Estate and Torc Waterfalls.

A walk around town is among the best things to do here, where you’ll see historic buildings like the Muckross Abbey, St. Mary’s Cathedral and  Ross Castle.

Killarney also has a great pub scene that you lust check out for a truly Irish experience that you won’t soon forget. 

READ MORE: 10 BEST THINGS TO DO IN KILLARNEY, IRELAND

5. Valentia, Co. Kerry

Valentia Island Ireland

Easily one of the most beautiful and unique towns in Ireland, Valentia is found on an island with the same name.

It is located in the Iveragh Peninsula in the southwest of Ireland. 

From here, you can also visit the ancient monastic island of Skellig Michael.

Valentia is easily accessible from the mainland via a bridge from Portmagee, and can also be reached by a car ferry from Reenard Point. 

Valentia is best known for the fossilized footprints from 385 million years ago, said to be among the world’s oldest remnants of vertebrate life on land.

Another stunning place to see here is the lovely Glanleam House with its sub-tropical gardens. These gardeners have a unique microclimate, and therefore houses a variety of rare plants. 

Best cities and towns in other parts of Ireland

6. Birr, Co. Offaly

Birr Castle, Offaly

The picturesque heritage town of Birr used to be called Parsostown, after the Parsons family, who owned the castle and estate. 

The town takes pride in its unique character and long history, seen in the colorful Georgian buildings.

Of all the lovely structures you’ll see in this town in County Offaly, Birr Castles has to be the most intriguing.

Built by the Parsons family, the Earl of Rosse, its most unique feature is the massive telescope that stands on its grounds up to this day.

It was the world’s biggest until 1927 and played a significant part in the advancement of astronomy.

READ MORE: 11 BEST THINGS TO DO IN OFFALY, IRELAND

7. Galway, Co. Galway

spanish arch galway

Galway is the ideal base to explore the Aran Islands or Connemara. It is also easily accessible to the Cliffs of Moher.

This captivating town is known for its artsy, bohemian vibe, evident in its lively pub scene mixed with quaint little shops that sell books, handcrafted Claddagh rings, and musical instruments. 

It’s center bursts with light and color, but one will still see remnants of the medieval town walls and castles.

While here and aside from the much talked about pub scene, have a meal or a drink in one of the many restaurants and cafés — they double as front seats to enjoy talented buskers and street theater.

Walk on the bridges over River Corrib, or stroll through the promenade with views of Galway Bay.

While here, be sure to have some of Galway’s famous native oysters — said to be the best in the world. 

READ MORE: 20 BEST THINGS TO DO IN GALWAY, IRELAND

8. Howth, Co. Dublin

howth ireland

Located east of Dublin is the picturesque village of Howth, on the north coast of the Howth Peninsula.

It is a favorite weekend getaway for those living in the nearby capital, as it’s just a quick trip via the DART line.

Its history and varied landscape is a lovely discovery for visitors who are curious enough to see more of Ireland apart from busy Dublin

Being a port and fishing town, among the best things to do here involves spending time on the pier, visiting nearby islands, or watching the sunset as fisherfolk get their boats ready.

Around town, there’s the 15th-century Howth Castle and its rhododendron gardens, the Martello Tower which houses a vintage radio museum and the medieval ruins of St. Mary’s Abbey. 

READ MORE: 12 BEST THINGS TO DO IN HOWTH, IRELAND

9. Strandhill, Co. Sligo

Strandhill Beach

Situated at the west of Sligo town and on the base of the Knocknarea Mountain is the coastal town of Strandhill.

It is known for its quiet stretches of rocky beaches and as a haven for surfers. It is not advisable to swim on the beach, however, because of the strong currents and tides.

Still, it is an ideal place for long quiet walks, from Strandhill to Culleenamore Strand, and also to Killaspubrone. 

Apart from its lovely coast, Strandhill also has interesting establishments and structures such as the 200-year-old traditional thatched cottage called Dolly’s Cottage, and the Carrowmore megalithic tombs which is one of the biggest in Ireland. 

READ MORE: 10 BEST THINGS TO DO IN SLIGO, IRELAND

10. Lismore, County Waterford

Lismore Castle

Surrounded by beautiful countryside, Lismore in County Waterford is one of those towns in Ireland that’s perfect for the outdoorsy types, or simply those who enjoy nature walks.

This historic town is situated at the foot of Knockmealdown Mountains, in Ireland’s Munster province. 

One of the most popular attractions in Lismore is the 800-year-old castle, which stands on the site of an old monastery on a steep hill.

This imposing castle was built during the medieval era, and its location offers stunning views of the town and the nearby Blackwater valley.

Lismore Castle was the former home of important historical artifacts such as the Book of Lismore, which is now in the Chatsworth House in Derbyshire, and the Lismore Crozier, now housed in the National Museum of Ireland. 

READ MORE: 15 BEST THINGS TO DO IN WATERFORD, IRELAND

11. Kilkenny, Co. Kilkenny

Kilkenny Castle

Just a few hours away from Dublin, in the southeast is the charming medieval town of Kilkenny.

The town is best known for its grand castle and deeply religious roots, as seen in the brilliantly preserved churches and monasteries such as the majestic St. Canice’s Cathedral and the Black Abbey Dominican priory, which both date back to the 13th century. 

Kilkenny is a medieval town in southeast Ireland. 

It may be among the most recognizable buildings in Ireland but while in town, it is still a must for anyone to see Kilkenny Castle, built in 1195 by Norman occupiers.

There’s just a lot to see and do inside — with its important collections, an impressive art gallery, a crafts hub, and a working farm. 

READ MORE: 10 BEST THINGS TO DO IN KILKENNY, IRELAND

12. Westport, Co. Mayo

Westport House

Situated by the scenic Clew Bay, the picturesque town of Westport is a must-visit in County Mayo.

It is known for its colorful town center, and with its location by the bay, Westport is also known as a hub for a variety of water activities like fishing, kayaking, paddleboarding, sailing, snorkeling, surfing, and windsurfing. 

For a unique kind of adventure mixed with the town’s fast local history, there’s the Pirate Adventure Park that’s a feature of the beautiful Westport House.

This Georgian era estate also features lush gardens, an aviary, a mini-railway, and a house that has rooms with period decor and furnishings. 

READ MORE: 15 BEST THINGS TO DO IN WESTPORT, IRELAND


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BEST TOWNS AND CITIES IN IRELAND

BEST TOWNS AND CITIES IN IRELAND

 

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